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Article: Indigenous microflora and opportunistic pathogens of the freshwater zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha

TitleIndigenous microflora and opportunistic pathogens of the freshwater zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha
Authors
KeywordsBacteria
Biofouling
Dreissena polymorpha
Microflora
Opportunistic pathogens
Zebra mussel
Issue Date2002
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-8158
Citation
Hydrobiologia, 2002, v. 474, p. 81-90 How to Cite?
AbstractFreshwater fouling invertebrate zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) harbor a diverse population of microorganisms in the Great Lakes of North America. Among the indigenous microorganisms, selective species are opportunistic pathogens to zebra mussels. Pathogenicity to zebra mussels by opportunistic bacteria isolated from the mussels was investigated in this study. Among the more than 30 bacteria isolated from temperature-stressed mussels, Aeromonas media, A. veronii, A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, and Shewanella putrefaciens are virulent pathogens to juvenile zebra mussels. Inoculation of a bacterial concentration of A. media, A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida and S. putrefaciens at 107 cells per zebra mussel resulted in 100% mortality within 5 days, and only 64.9% for A. veronii. In contrast, mortality was less than 12.3% following inoculation of a sterile phosphate buffer solution as a control. In addition, mortality was dependent on the size of the pathogen population used in inoculation and the incubation temperature, indicating the close relationship between the bacterial population and subsequent death. On the mussel tissue, a dense microbial population was evident from the moribund mussels viewed with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Opportunistic bacteria invaded and destroyed the D. polymorpha tissue after 7 days of incubation when the bacterial inoculation was larger than 105 per zebra mussel. Our results suggest that mussels are reservoirs of opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms to aquatic organisms and humans and a better understanding of the microbial ecology of the mussels will provide insights to the possible health hazards from these microorganisms.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73114
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.051
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.043
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:48:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:48:17Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHydrobiologia, 2002, v. 474, p. 81-90en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0018-8158en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73114-
dc.description.abstractFreshwater fouling invertebrate zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) harbor a diverse population of microorganisms in the Great Lakes of North America. Among the indigenous microorganisms, selective species are opportunistic pathogens to zebra mussels. Pathogenicity to zebra mussels by opportunistic bacteria isolated from the mussels was investigated in this study. Among the more than 30 bacteria isolated from temperature-stressed mussels, Aeromonas media, A. veronii, A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, and Shewanella putrefaciens are virulent pathogens to juvenile zebra mussels. Inoculation of a bacterial concentration of A. media, A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida and S. putrefaciens at 107 cells per zebra mussel resulted in 100% mortality within 5 days, and only 64.9% for A. veronii. In contrast, mortality was less than 12.3% following inoculation of a sterile phosphate buffer solution as a control. In addition, mortality was dependent on the size of the pathogen population used in inoculation and the incubation temperature, indicating the close relationship between the bacterial population and subsequent death. On the mussel tissue, a dense microbial population was evident from the moribund mussels viewed with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Opportunistic bacteria invaded and destroyed the D. polymorpha tissue after 7 days of incubation when the bacterial inoculation was larger than 105 per zebra mussel. Our results suggest that mussels are reservoirs of opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms to aquatic organisms and humans and a better understanding of the microbial ecology of the mussels will provide insights to the possible health hazards from these microorganisms.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-8158en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHydrobiologiaen_HK
dc.subjectBacteriaen_HK
dc.subjectBiofoulingen_HK
dc.subjectDreissena polymorphaen_HK
dc.subjectMicrofloraen_HK
dc.subjectOpportunistic pathogensen_HK
dc.subjectZebra musselen_HK
dc.titleIndigenous microflora and opportunistic pathogens of the freshwater zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorphaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0018-8158&volume=474&spage=81&epage=90&date=2002&atitle=Indigenous+microflora+and+opportunistic+pathogens+of+the+freshwater+zebra+mussel,+Dreissena+polymorphaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1016517107473en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037092214en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros72207en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037092214&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume474en_HK
dc.identifier.spage81en_HK
dc.identifier.epage90en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177101300005-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMitchell, R=7403974570en_HK

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