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Article: Uranium metallogenesis in South China and its relationship to crustal extension during the cretaceous to tertiary

TitleUranium metallogenesis in South China and its relationship to crustal extension during the cretaceous to tertiary
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherSociety of Economic Geologists, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.segweb.org/publications/journal.aspx
Citation
Economic Geology, 2008, v. 103 n. 3, p. 583-598 How to Cite?
AbstractSouth China is rich in vein-type hydrothermal uranium deposits hosted in granitic, volcanic, and carbonaceous and siliceous pelitic sedimentary rocks. The uranium deposits are spatially associated with extensional structures and/or mantle-derived mafic dikes. Both the uranium deposits and mafic dikes are Cretaceous to Tertiary in age, temporally coincident with the crustal extension. Carbon isotope analyses of calcite deposited in the main-stage mineralization in the veins from 12 representative uranium deposits yield δ13C values of ore-forming fluids mainly from -4 to -8 per mil, which are permissive of a mantle origin for the CO2 in the ore-forming fluids. A mantle origin is consistent with the association of the deposits with mafic dikes and the 3He/4He ratios of ore-forming fluids (e.g., 0.10-2.02 Ra for the volcanic-hosted Xiangshan uranium deposit). Isotopic compositions of H and 0 demonstrate that water in the ore-forming fluids is predominantly meteoric in origin. Ore-forming temperatures ranged approximately from 150° to 250°C. Uranium-rich crustal rocks in South China may have been the sources for the uranium. Crustal extension and associated mafic magmatism are considered to have heated the rocks and allowed CO2 (possibly from mantle sources) to migrate upward and to mix with CO2-poor meteoric water. The CO2-rich hydrothermal fluids mobilized uranium from the source rocks and then the uranium was deposited in various host rocks to form the uranium deposits. © 2008 Society of Economic Geologists, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73093
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.487
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, RZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBi, XWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, MFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeng, JTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSu, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQi, HWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:47:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:47:59Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEconomic Geology, 2008, v. 103 n. 3, p. 583-598en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0361-0128en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73093-
dc.description.abstractSouth China is rich in vein-type hydrothermal uranium deposits hosted in granitic, volcanic, and carbonaceous and siliceous pelitic sedimentary rocks. The uranium deposits are spatially associated with extensional structures and/or mantle-derived mafic dikes. Both the uranium deposits and mafic dikes are Cretaceous to Tertiary in age, temporally coincident with the crustal extension. Carbon isotope analyses of calcite deposited in the main-stage mineralization in the veins from 12 representative uranium deposits yield δ13C values of ore-forming fluids mainly from -4 to -8 per mil, which are permissive of a mantle origin for the CO2 in the ore-forming fluids. A mantle origin is consistent with the association of the deposits with mafic dikes and the 3He/4He ratios of ore-forming fluids (e.g., 0.10-2.02 Ra for the volcanic-hosted Xiangshan uranium deposit). Isotopic compositions of H and 0 demonstrate that water in the ore-forming fluids is predominantly meteoric in origin. Ore-forming temperatures ranged approximately from 150° to 250°C. Uranium-rich crustal rocks in South China may have been the sources for the uranium. Crustal extension and associated mafic magmatism are considered to have heated the rocks and allowed CO2 (possibly from mantle sources) to migrate upward and to mix with CO2-poor meteoric water. The CO2-rich hydrothermal fluids mobilized uranium from the source rocks and then the uranium was deposited in various host rocks to form the uranium deposits. © 2008 Society of Economic Geologists, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety of Economic Geologists, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.segweb.org/publications/journal.aspxen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEconomic Geologyen_HK
dc.titleUranium metallogenesis in South China and its relationship to crustal extension during the cretaceous to tertiaryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0361-0128&volume=103&issue=3&spage=583&epage=598&date=2008&atitle=Uranium+metallogenesis+in+South+China+and+its+relationship+to+crustal+extension+during+the+Cretaceous+to+Tertiaryen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhou, MF:mfzhou@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, MF=rp00844en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2113/gsecongeo.103.3.583en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53749098047en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros167307en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53749098047&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume103en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage583en_HK
dc.identifier.epage598en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258310800006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, RZ=7202640800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBi, XW=7102242579en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, MF=7403506005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeng, JT=8230916900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSu, WC=7402010379en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, S=35240550100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQi, HW=7202348798en_HK

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