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Article: Structural control on uranium mineralization in South China: Implications for fluid flow in continental strike-slip faults

TitleStructural control on uranium mineralization in South China: Implications for fluid flow in continental strike-slip faults
Authors
KeywordsFluid flow
South China
Strike-slip fault
Transtension
Uranium deposits
Issue Date2002
Publisher中國科學院. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdxg.chinajournal.net.cn/
Citation
Science In China, Series D: Earth Sciences, 2002, v. 45 n. 9, p. 851-864 How to Cite?
AbstractSouth China is the most important uranium producer in the country. Much of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic geology of this area was dominated by NNE-trending intracontinental strike-slip faulting that resulted from oblique subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate underneath the eastern China continent. This strike-slip fault system was characterized by transpression in the early-mid Jurassic and by transtension from the latest Jurassic through Cretaceous to early Tertiary. Most uranium ore deposits in South China are strictly fault-hosted and associated with mid-late Mesozoic granitic intrusions and volcanic rocks, which formed under transpression and transtension regimes, respectively. Various data demonstrate that the NNE-trending strike-slip faults have played critical roles in the formation and distribution of hydrothermal uranium deposits. Extensive geochronological studies show that a majority of uranium deposits in South China formed during the time period of 140-40 Ma with peak ages between 87-48 Ma, coinciding well with the time interval of transtension. However, hydrothermal uranium deposits are not uniformly distributed along individual strike-slip fault. The most important ore-hosting segments are pull-apart stepovers, splay structures, extensional strike-slip duplexes, releasing bends and fault intersections. This non-uniform distribution of ore occurences in individual fault zone reflects localization of hydrothermal fluids within those segments that were highly dilational and thus extremely permeable. The unique geometric patterns and structural styles of strike-slip faults may have facilitated mixing of deeply derived and near-surface fluids, as evidenced by stable isotopic data from many uranium deposits in South China. The identification of fault segments favorable for uranium mineralization in South China is important for understanding the genesis of hydrothermal ore deposits within continental strike-slip faults, and therefore has great implications for exploration strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73016
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 1.588
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFu, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:47:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:47:15Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationScience In China, Series D: Earth Sciences, 2002, v. 45 n. 9, p. 851-864en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1006-9313en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73016-
dc.description.abstractSouth China is the most important uranium producer in the country. Much of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic geology of this area was dominated by NNE-trending intracontinental strike-slip faulting that resulted from oblique subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate underneath the eastern China continent. This strike-slip fault system was characterized by transpression in the early-mid Jurassic and by transtension from the latest Jurassic through Cretaceous to early Tertiary. Most uranium ore deposits in South China are strictly fault-hosted and associated with mid-late Mesozoic granitic intrusions and volcanic rocks, which formed under transpression and transtension regimes, respectively. Various data demonstrate that the NNE-trending strike-slip faults have played critical roles in the formation and distribution of hydrothermal uranium deposits. Extensive geochronological studies show that a majority of uranium deposits in South China formed during the time period of 140-40 Ma with peak ages between 87-48 Ma, coinciding well with the time interval of transtension. However, hydrothermal uranium deposits are not uniformly distributed along individual strike-slip fault. The most important ore-hosting segments are pull-apart stepovers, splay structures, extensional strike-slip duplexes, releasing bends and fault intersections. This non-uniform distribution of ore occurences in individual fault zone reflects localization of hydrothermal fluids within those segments that were highly dilational and thus extremely permeable. The unique geometric patterns and structural styles of strike-slip faults may have facilitated mixing of deeply derived and near-surface fluids, as evidenced by stable isotopic data from many uranium deposits in South China. The identification of fault segments favorable for uranium mineralization in South China is important for understanding the genesis of hydrothermal ore deposits within continental strike-slip faults, and therefore has great implications for exploration strategies.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisher中國科學院. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdxg.chinajournal.net.cn/zh_HK
dc.relation.ispartofScience in China, Series D: Earth Sciencesen_HK
dc.subjectFluid flowen_HK
dc.subjectSouth Chinaen_HK
dc.subjectStrike-slip faulten_HK
dc.subjectTranstensionen_HK
dc.subjectUranium depositsen_HK
dc.titleStructural control on uranium mineralization in South China: Implications for fluid flow in continental strike-slip faultsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0036-8237&volume=v45&spage=851&epage=864&date=2002&atitle=Structural+control+on+uranium+mineralization+in+South+China:+Implications+for+fluid+flow+in+continental+strike-slip+faultsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhou, M:mfzhou@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, M=rp00844en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1360/02yd9084en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036763719en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros82676en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036763719&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume45en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage851en_HK
dc.identifier.epage864en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177545700008-
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, J=36063037900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, M=7403506005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, X=26661069800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, Z=7403347778en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Z=7409080919en_HK

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