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Article: A 5,600-year-old wooden well in Zhejiang Province, China
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TitleA 5,600-year-old wooden well in Zhejiang Province, China
 
AuthorsJiao, JJ1
 
KeywordsArchaeology
Cultural layers
Hemudu centre
Prehistory
Water supply
Wooden piles
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/10040/index.htm
 
CitationHydrogeology Journal, 2007, v. 15 n. 5, p. 1021-1029 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10040-006-0157-6
 
AbstractIn 1973, traces of China's early Neolithic Hemudu culture (7,000-5,000 BP) were discovered in the village of Hemudu in Yuyao County, Zhejiang Province, in the lower Yangtze River coastal plain. The site has yielded animal and plant remains in large quantities and large numbers of logs secured with tenon and mortise joints, commonly used in wooden buildings and other wooden structures. For hydrogeologists, the most interesting structure is an ancient wooden well. The well is believed to be about 5,600 years old, which makes it the oldest wooden well yet found in China. The well site contains over 200 wooden components and can be divided into inner and outer parts. The outer part consists of 28 piles around a pond. The inner part, the wooden well itself, lies in the middle of the pond. The walls of the well were lined with close-set timber piles reinforced by a square wooden frame. The 28 piles in the outer part of the site may have been part of a shelter for the well, suggesting that the people of the Hemudu culture were already concerned with water hygiene and protection of their water source. © Springer-Verlag 2007.
 
ISSN1431-2174
2013 Impact Factor: 1.712
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.167
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10040-006-0157-6
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000248056700014
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorJiao, JJ
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:46:40Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:46:40Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractIn 1973, traces of China's early Neolithic Hemudu culture (7,000-5,000 BP) were discovered in the village of Hemudu in Yuyao County, Zhejiang Province, in the lower Yangtze River coastal plain. The site has yielded animal and plant remains in large quantities and large numbers of logs secured with tenon and mortise joints, commonly used in wooden buildings and other wooden structures. For hydrogeologists, the most interesting structure is an ancient wooden well. The well is believed to be about 5,600 years old, which makes it the oldest wooden well yet found in China. The well site contains over 200 wooden components and can be divided into inner and outer parts. The outer part consists of 28 piles around a pond. The inner part, the wooden well itself, lies in the middle of the pond. The walls of the well were lined with close-set timber piles reinforced by a square wooden frame. The 28 piles in the outer part of the site may have been part of a shelter for the well, suggesting that the people of the Hemudu culture were already concerned with water hygiene and protection of their water source. © Springer-Verlag 2007.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationHydrogeology Journal, 2007, v. 15 n. 5, p. 1021-1029 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10040-006-0157-6
 
dc.identifier.citeulike1612676
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10040-006-0157-6
 
dc.identifier.epage1029
 
dc.identifier.hkuros136336
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248056700014
 
dc.identifier.issn1431-2174
2013 Impact Factor: 1.712
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.167
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34547115017
 
dc.identifier.spage1021
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72954
 
dc.identifier.volume15
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/10040/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofHydrogeology Journal
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectArchaeology
 
dc.subjectCultural layers
 
dc.subjectHemudu centre
 
dc.subjectPrehistory
 
dc.subjectWater supply
 
dc.subjectWooden piles
 
dc.titleA 5,600-year-old wooden well in Zhejiang Province, China
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong