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Article: Oceanic lithosphere 3. The origin and evolution of oceanic lithosphere: The geochemistry and origin of oceanic lavas

TitleOceanic lithosphere 3. The origin and evolution of oceanic lithosphere: The geochemistry and origin of oceanic lavas
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherGeological Association of Canada. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.gac.ca/JOURNALS/geocan.html
Citation
Geoscience Canada, 1999, v. 26 n. 2, p. 71-80 How to Cite?
AbstractOceanic lavas are the most voluminous volcanic products on Earth. Between 15 and 20 km3 of new oceanic crust is created every year by eruption of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) along sea-floor spreading axes. MORB lavas are olivine- and hypersthene-normative tholeiites highly depleted in incompatible trace elements such as Rb, Sr, Ba, K, Zr, Y and the light rare earth elements. Isotopically, they are characterised by low radiogenic Sr and Pb and high radiogenic Nd. They are formed by decompressional melting of shallow mantle material as it rises beneath spreading axes. This upper mantle source was previously depleted in incompatible elements by extraction of continental crustal material early in Earth history. On a global scale MORB lavas are remarkably uniform, but relatively enriched varieties (E-MORB) are known from all ridge segments. These enriched lavas are transitional in composition to ocean island basalts (OIB) which have much higher contents of incompatible elements and much more varied isotopic compositions than typical MORB lavas. Ocean island basalts are believed to form by partial melting of mantle plumes that rise from near the core-mantle boundary. These plumes entrain mantle material that has been relatively enriched by recycled crustal materials in subduction zones. Mixing of plume mantle and depleted MORB mantle on a variety of scales can explain the occurrence of E-MORB lavas. Large-scale superplumes are believed to be responsible for the formation of oceanic plateaus, which are built by voluminous eruptions of ocean island basalts.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72914
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.225
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.577
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMalpas, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:46:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:46:18Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGeoscience Canada, 1999, v. 26 n. 2, p. 71-80en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0315-0941en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72914-
dc.description.abstractOceanic lavas are the most voluminous volcanic products on Earth. Between 15 and 20 km3 of new oceanic crust is created every year by eruption of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) along sea-floor spreading axes. MORB lavas are olivine- and hypersthene-normative tholeiites highly depleted in incompatible trace elements such as Rb, Sr, Ba, K, Zr, Y and the light rare earth elements. Isotopically, they are characterised by low radiogenic Sr and Pb and high radiogenic Nd. They are formed by decompressional melting of shallow mantle material as it rises beneath spreading axes. This upper mantle source was previously depleted in incompatible elements by extraction of continental crustal material early in Earth history. On a global scale MORB lavas are remarkably uniform, but relatively enriched varieties (E-MORB) are known from all ridge segments. These enriched lavas are transitional in composition to ocean island basalts (OIB) which have much higher contents of incompatible elements and much more varied isotopic compositions than typical MORB lavas. Ocean island basalts are believed to form by partial melting of mantle plumes that rise from near the core-mantle boundary. These plumes entrain mantle material that has been relatively enriched by recycled crustal materials in subduction zones. Mixing of plume mantle and depleted MORB mantle on a variety of scales can explain the occurrence of E-MORB lavas. Large-scale superplumes are believed to be responsible for the formation of oceanic plateaus, which are built by voluminous eruptions of ocean island basalts.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherGeological Association of Canada. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.gac.ca/JOURNALS/geocan.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGeoscience Canadaen_HK
dc.titleOceanic lithosphere 3. The origin and evolution of oceanic lithosphere: The geochemistry and origin of oceanic lavasen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0315-0941&volume=26-2&spage=71&epage=80&date=1999&atitle=Oceanic+lithosphere+3.+The+origin+and+evolution+of+oceanic+lithosphere:+The+geochemistry+and+origin+of+oceanic+lavasen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMalpas, J: jgmalpas@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMalpas, J=rp00059en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032703038en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros47039en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032703038&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage71en_HK
dc.identifier.epage80en_HK
dc.publisher.placeCanadaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRobinson, PT=7403720506en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMalpas, J=7006136845en_HK

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