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Article: Nd isotopic constraints on crustal formation in the North China Craton

TitleNd isotopic constraints on crustal formation in the North China Craton
Authors
KeywordsCrustal growth
Model age
North China Craton
Sm-Nd
Tectonic evolution
Issue Date2005
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaes
Citation
Journal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 2005, v. 24 n. 5 SPEC. ISS., p. 523-545 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent tectonic analysis suggests that the North China Craton consists of two Archean continental blocks, called the Eastern and Western Blocks, separated by the Paleoproterozoic Trans-North China Orogen. Although the published geochronological data are not sufficient to constrain the detailed tectonothermal evolution of the craton, the available Nd isotopic data show some important differences in Nd model ages between the tectonic units. The Eastern Block shows two main Nd model age peaks, one between 3.6 and 3.2 Ga and the other between 3.0 and 2.6 Ga. Limited Nd isotopic data from the Western Block show a large range of model ages between 3.2 and 2.4 Ga. These differences are consistent with the recently-proposed model. The Nd isotopic data from mantle-derived mafic rocks indicate that the mantle beneath the North China Craton was depleted in the Archean, consistent with major crustal growth during this period. In the Paleoproterozoic, however, the mantle-derived mafic rocks show negative ε Nd(t) values, implying crustal contamination. This may have resulted from subduction and collision between the Eastern and Western Block, implying that the mechanisms of crustal formation and evolution may have been different between the Archean and Paleoproterozoic. The North China Craton was re-activated by addition of mantle-derived magma into the lower crust in the late Mesozoic, resulting in rejuvenation of the lower crust. This indicates that underplating is also an important mechanism for continental addition, although in this case it may not equate to crustal growth, since it was preceded by removal of lithospheric mantle and possible some lower crust. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72880
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.647
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.393
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilde, SAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:45:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:45:59Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 2005, v. 24 n. 5 SPEC. ISS., p. 523-545en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1367-9120en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72880-
dc.description.abstractRecent tectonic analysis suggests that the North China Craton consists of two Archean continental blocks, called the Eastern and Western Blocks, separated by the Paleoproterozoic Trans-North China Orogen. Although the published geochronological data are not sufficient to constrain the detailed tectonothermal evolution of the craton, the available Nd isotopic data show some important differences in Nd model ages between the tectonic units. The Eastern Block shows two main Nd model age peaks, one between 3.6 and 3.2 Ga and the other between 3.0 and 2.6 Ga. Limited Nd isotopic data from the Western Block show a large range of model ages between 3.2 and 2.4 Ga. These differences are consistent with the recently-proposed model. The Nd isotopic data from mantle-derived mafic rocks indicate that the mantle beneath the North China Craton was depleted in the Archean, consistent with major crustal growth during this period. In the Paleoproterozoic, however, the mantle-derived mafic rocks show negative ε Nd(t) values, implying crustal contamination. This may have resulted from subduction and collision between the Eastern and Western Block, implying that the mechanisms of crustal formation and evolution may have been different between the Archean and Paleoproterozoic. The North China Craton was re-activated by addition of mantle-derived magma into the lower crust in the late Mesozoic, resulting in rejuvenation of the lower crust. This indicates that underplating is also an important mechanism for continental addition, although in this case it may not equate to crustal growth, since it was preceded by removal of lithospheric mantle and possible some lower crust. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaesen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Asian Earth Sciencesen_HK
dc.subjectCrustal growthen_HK
dc.subjectModel ageen_HK
dc.subjectNorth China Cratonen_HK
dc.subjectSm-Nden_HK
dc.subjectTectonic evolutionen_HK
dc.titleNd isotopic constraints on crustal formation in the North China Cratonen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1367-9120&volume=24&issue=5&spage=523&epage=545&date=FEB&atitle=Nd+isotopic+constraints+on+crustal+formation+in+the+North+China+Cratonen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhao, G:gzhao@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhao, G=rp00842en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jseaes.2003.10.011en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-14944373850en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros108533en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-14944373850&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5 SPEC. ISS.en_HK
dc.identifier.spage523en_HK
dc.identifier.epage545en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228247800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, F=40561925600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, G=7403296321en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilde, SA=35254758600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, D=7403969024en_HK

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