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Article: Early colonization of thermal niches in a silica-depositing hot spring in central Tibet

TitleEarly colonization of thermal niches in a silica-depositing hot spring in central Tibet
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1472-4677
Citation
Geobiology, 2008, v. 6 n. 2, p. 136-146 How to Cite?
AbstractThermophilic microbial mats dominated by the anoxygenic phototroph Roseiflexus castenholzii commonly develop around sinter-depositing geysers in the Daggyai Tso geothermal field of central Tibet. In this study we used morphological and molecular genetic techniques to reveal a diverse pioneer biofilm community including both archaea and bacteria involved in early colonization of such thermal niches at temperatures ranging from 46 to 77°C. Sinter precipitation and biomineralization were evident at all locations, but the latter was selective between taxa and most evident on filamentous cells. Evidence for possible indirect biosignatures from biofilms overwhelmed by sinter deposition was found. Succession to a mature community appeared to relate to the growth rate for key taxa outpacing that of silicification within an optimum temperature range of 54-61°C. The thin surface layer of silicification- resistant cyanobacteria that developed on the surface of mature mats may play a role in preventing biomineralization of the susceptible R. castenholzii beneath within these communities. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72845
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.5
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.780
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAitchison, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:45:38Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:45:38Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGeobiology, 2008, v. 6 n. 2, p. 136-146en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1472-4677en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72845-
dc.description.abstractThermophilic microbial mats dominated by the anoxygenic phototroph Roseiflexus castenholzii commonly develop around sinter-depositing geysers in the Daggyai Tso geothermal field of central Tibet. In this study we used morphological and molecular genetic techniques to reveal a diverse pioneer biofilm community including both archaea and bacteria involved in early colonization of such thermal niches at temperatures ranging from 46 to 77°C. Sinter precipitation and biomineralization were evident at all locations, but the latter was selective between taxa and most evident on filamentous cells. Evidence for possible indirect biosignatures from biofilms overwhelmed by sinter deposition was found. Succession to a mature community appeared to relate to the growth rate for key taxa outpacing that of silicification within an optimum temperature range of 54-61°C. The thin surface layer of silicification- resistant cyanobacteria that developed on the surface of mature mats may play a role in preventing biomineralization of the susceptible R. castenholzii beneath within these communities. © 2007 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1472-4677en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGeobiologyen_HK
dc.rightsGeobiology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.titleEarly colonization of thermal niches in a silica-depositing hot spring in central Tibeten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1472-4677&volume=6&spage=136&epage=146&date=2007&atitle=Early+colonization+of+thermal+niches+in+a+silica-depositing+hot+spring+in+central+Tibeten_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, CY: maglau@princeton.eduen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAitchison, JC: jona@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CY=rp00721en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAitchison, JC=rp00658en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1472-4669.2007.00124.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18380876-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38849149644en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros139356en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38849149644&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage136en_HK
dc.identifier.epage146en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000252808200005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CY=35177794300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAitchison, JC=7102533858en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2321677-

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