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Article: Paleomagnetism of Borneo

TitlePaleomagnetism of Borneo
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaes
Citation
Journal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 1999, v. 17 n. 1-2, p. 3-24 How to Cite?
AbstractThe paleomagnetism of Borneo remains controversial, although the preponderance of results, both from the island itself and from the surrounding regions, suggest that counterclockwise (CCW) rotation has taken place. CCW rotations are seen in minor intrusions in Sarawak, Sabah and Kalimantan, which increase systematically with the age of the intrusion to a maximum value of 51.8°± 3.7°. The rotation can be no older than 25 Ma, which is the age of the intrusion showing the maximum rotation. The rotation appears to have neared completion by 10 Ma. Similar CCW rotations are seen in sites from Peninsular Malaysia through Borneo to Sulawesi, the Celebes Sea and Palawan in the Philippines, but the ages of these rotations are, for the most part, unknown. In Mesozoic rocks in Kalimantan and Sarawak, a stronger declination rotation of nearly 90°CCW is recorded at seven sites, including sites which pass fold and reversal tests. This strong rotation is no older than youngest Cretaceous, and although seen over a wide region in Borneo, it is not seen in Peninsular Malaysia, nor in the Celebes Sea or Palawan, where only the weaker CCW rotation is seen. The widespread occurrence of this strong rotation in Western Borneo suggests that it is essentially a rigid plate, or microplate rotation, and not a series of local rotations caused by distributed shear in limited deformation zones. The rotation of Borneo appears to be a consequence of convergence between the Australian and Eurasian plates, which is accommodated by subduction along the northwest margin of Borneo.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72662
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.647
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.393
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorAli, JRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMoss, SJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFrost, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRichter, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorMahfi, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:43:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:43:56Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 1999, v. 17 n. 1-2, p. 3-24en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1367-9120en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72662-
dc.description.abstractThe paleomagnetism of Borneo remains controversial, although the preponderance of results, both from the island itself and from the surrounding regions, suggest that counterclockwise (CCW) rotation has taken place. CCW rotations are seen in minor intrusions in Sarawak, Sabah and Kalimantan, which increase systematically with the age of the intrusion to a maximum value of 51.8°± 3.7°. The rotation can be no older than 25 Ma, which is the age of the intrusion showing the maximum rotation. The rotation appears to have neared completion by 10 Ma. Similar CCW rotations are seen in sites from Peninsular Malaysia through Borneo to Sulawesi, the Celebes Sea and Palawan in the Philippines, but the ages of these rotations are, for the most part, unknown. In Mesozoic rocks in Kalimantan and Sarawak, a stronger declination rotation of nearly 90°CCW is recorded at seven sites, including sites which pass fold and reversal tests. This strong rotation is no older than youngest Cretaceous, and although seen over a wide region in Borneo, it is not seen in Peninsular Malaysia, nor in the Celebes Sea or Palawan, where only the weaker CCW rotation is seen. The widespread occurrence of this strong rotation in Western Borneo suggests that it is essentially a rigid plate, or microplate rotation, and not a series of local rotations caused by distributed shear in limited deformation zones. The rotation of Borneo appears to be a consequence of convergence between the Australian and Eurasian plates, which is accommodated by subduction along the northwest margin of Borneo.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaesen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Asian Earth Sciencesen_HK
dc.titlePaleomagnetism of Borneoen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1367-9120&volume=17&spage=3&epage=24&date=1999&atitle=Paleomagnetism+of+Borneoen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAli, JR:jrali@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAli, JR=rp00659en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0743-9547(98)00057-9en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032995452en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros46983en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032995452&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3en_HK
dc.identifier.epage24en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000080098900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFuller, M=7202312261en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAli, JR=7102266465en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMoss, SJ=7402067343en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFrost, GM=47261001500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRichter, B=7101774843en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMahfi, A=6508056371en_HK

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