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Article: A Paleo-Mesoproterozoic supercontinent: Assembly, growth and breakup

TitleA Paleo-Mesoproterozoic supercontinent: Assembly, growth and breakup
Authors
KeywordsAccretion
Assembly
Breakup
Paleo-Mesoproterozoic
Reconstruction
Supercontinent
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/earscirev
Citation
Earth-Science Reviews, 2004, v. 67 n. 1-2, p. 91-123 How to Cite?
AbstractGeological and paleomagnetic data support the hypothesis that a Paleo-Mesoproterozoic supercontinent, referred to as Columbia, existed before the formation of Rodinia. This pre-Rodinia supercontinent was assembled along global-scale 2.1-1.8 Ga collisional orogens and contained almost all of Earth's continental blocks. Following its final assembly at ∼1.8 Ga, the supercontinent Columbia underwent long-lived (1.8-1.3 Ga), subduction-related growth via accretion at key continental margins, forming a 1.8-1.3 Ga large magmatic accretionary belt along the present-day southern margin of North America, Greenland and Baltica. It includes the 1.8-1.7 Ga Yavapai, Central Plains and Makkovikian Belts, 1.7-1.6 Ga Mazatzal and Labradorian Belts, 1.5-1.3 Ga St. Francois and Spavinaw Belts and 1.3-1.2 Ga Elzevirian Belt in North America; the 1.8-1.7 Ga Ketilidian Belt in Greenland; and the 1.8-1.7-Transscandinavian Igneous Belt, 1.7-1.6 Ga Kongsberggian-Gothian Belt, and 1.5-1.3 Ga Southwest Sweden Granitoid Belt in Baltica. Other cratonic blocks also underwent marginal outgrowth at about the same time. In South America, a 1.8-1.3 Ga accretionary zone occurs along the western margin of the Amazonia Craton, represented by the Rio Negro, Juruena and Rondonian Belts. In Australia, 1.8-1.5 Ga accretionary magmatic belts, including the Arunta, Mt. Isa, Georgetown, Coen and Broken Hill Belts, occur surrounding the southern and eastern margins of the North Australia Craton and the eastern margin of the Gawler Craton. In China, a 1.8-1.4 Ga accretionary magmatic zone, called the Xiong'er belt (Group), extends along the southern margin of the North China Craton. Fragmentation of this supercontinent began about 1.6 Ga ago, associated with continental rifting along the western margin of Laurentia (Belt-Purcell Supergroup), southern margin of Baltica (Telemark Supergroup), southeastern margin of Siberia (Riphean aulacogens), northwestern margin of South Africa (Kalahari Copper Belt), and northern margin of North China (Zhaertai-Bayan Obo Belt). The fragmentation corresponded with widespread anorogenic magmatic activity, forming anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite (AMCG) suites in North America, Baltica, Amazonia and North China, and continued until the final breakup of the supercontinent at about 1.3-1.2 Ga, marked by the emplacement of the 1.27 Ga MacKenzie and 1.24 Ga Sudbury mafic dike swarms in North America. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72609
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.991
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.752
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilde, SAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:43:26Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:43:26Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEarth-Science Reviews, 2004, v. 67 n. 1-2, p. 91-123en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0012-8252en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72609-
dc.description.abstractGeological and paleomagnetic data support the hypothesis that a Paleo-Mesoproterozoic supercontinent, referred to as Columbia, existed before the formation of Rodinia. This pre-Rodinia supercontinent was assembled along global-scale 2.1-1.8 Ga collisional orogens and contained almost all of Earth's continental blocks. Following its final assembly at ∼1.8 Ga, the supercontinent Columbia underwent long-lived (1.8-1.3 Ga), subduction-related growth via accretion at key continental margins, forming a 1.8-1.3 Ga large magmatic accretionary belt along the present-day southern margin of North America, Greenland and Baltica. It includes the 1.8-1.7 Ga Yavapai, Central Plains and Makkovikian Belts, 1.7-1.6 Ga Mazatzal and Labradorian Belts, 1.5-1.3 Ga St. Francois and Spavinaw Belts and 1.3-1.2 Ga Elzevirian Belt in North America; the 1.8-1.7 Ga Ketilidian Belt in Greenland; and the 1.8-1.7-Transscandinavian Igneous Belt, 1.7-1.6 Ga Kongsberggian-Gothian Belt, and 1.5-1.3 Ga Southwest Sweden Granitoid Belt in Baltica. Other cratonic blocks also underwent marginal outgrowth at about the same time. In South America, a 1.8-1.3 Ga accretionary zone occurs along the western margin of the Amazonia Craton, represented by the Rio Negro, Juruena and Rondonian Belts. In Australia, 1.8-1.5 Ga accretionary magmatic belts, including the Arunta, Mt. Isa, Georgetown, Coen and Broken Hill Belts, occur surrounding the southern and eastern margins of the North Australia Craton and the eastern margin of the Gawler Craton. In China, a 1.8-1.4 Ga accretionary magmatic zone, called the Xiong'er belt (Group), extends along the southern margin of the North China Craton. Fragmentation of this supercontinent began about 1.6 Ga ago, associated with continental rifting along the western margin of Laurentia (Belt-Purcell Supergroup), southern margin of Baltica (Telemark Supergroup), southeastern margin of Siberia (Riphean aulacogens), northwestern margin of South Africa (Kalahari Copper Belt), and northern margin of North China (Zhaertai-Bayan Obo Belt). The fragmentation corresponded with widespread anorogenic magmatic activity, forming anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite (AMCG) suites in North America, Baltica, Amazonia and North China, and continued until the final breakup of the supercontinent at about 1.3-1.2 Ga, marked by the emplacement of the 1.27 Ga MacKenzie and 1.24 Ga Sudbury mafic dike swarms in North America. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/earscireven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEarth-Science Reviewsen_HK
dc.rightsEarth - Science Reviews. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectAccretionen_HK
dc.subjectAssemblyen_HK
dc.subjectBreakupen_HK
dc.subjectPaleo-Mesoproterozoicen_HK
dc.subjectReconstructionen_HK
dc.subjectSupercontinenten_HK
dc.titleA Paleo-Mesoproterozoic supercontinent: Assembly, growth and breakupen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0012-8252&volume= 67&spage=p. 91&epage=123.&date=2004&atitle=A+Paleo-Mesoproterozoic+supercontinent:+Assembly,+growth+and+breakupen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhao, G:gzhao@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSun, M:minsun@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhao, G=rp00842en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySun, M=rp00780en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.earscirev.2004.02.003en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-11144279125en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros91072en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-11144279125&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume67en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage91en_HK
dc.identifier.epage123en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225697300003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, G=7403296321en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, M=25932315800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilde, SA=35254758600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, S=8784176300en_HK

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