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Article: Peculiar geometry of northern Luzon, Philippines: Implications for regional tectonics of new gravity and paleomagnetic data

TitlePeculiar geometry of northern Luzon, Philippines: Implications for regional tectonics of new gravity and paleomagnetic data
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Geophysical Union.
Citation
Tectonics, 2006, v. 25 n. 4 How to Cite?
Abstract[1] The northern termination of the Philippine archipelago is remarkably abrupt. The distinctive, almost rectangular, shape of northern Luzon is a consequence of the almost simultaneous disappearance near 18°N of the Central Cordillera, the much narrower Sierra Madre, and the broad floodplain of the Cagayan River. The floodplain is underlain by a deep sedimentary basin that is closed off just inland of the coast by an ENE-WSW structural high known as the Sicalao Ridge. Gravity surveys show that the ridge has steep flanks that are almost certainly defined by faulting. In the same region, there is also a dramatic change in the Luzon Arc, which is the volcanic expression of subduction of the South China Sea. The volcanic centers in the Central Cordillera (the North Luzon Segment of the arc) are all now inactive, but further north eruptions are frequent on the small eastern islands of the Bashi Segment. The differences between the North Luzon and Bashi segments suggest that they had very different geological histories until the late Neogene, but the evolution of northern Luzon is so poorly understood that it is not even known on which plate it originated. New paleomagnetic data and the existence of the Sicalao Ridge provide important constraints on reconstructions and, when combined with geological data, favor the possibility that in the Paleogene the Central Cordillera and Sierra Madre were combined as parts of an arc at the southern margin of the Philippine Sea. The Sicalao Ridge can be interpreted as a rift margin feature created during the detachment of Luzon from continental Sundaland. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72588
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.75
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.628
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMilsom, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAli, JRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQueano, KLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:43:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:43:15Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTectonics, 2006, v. 25 n. 4en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0278-7407en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72588-
dc.description.abstract[1] The northern termination of the Philippine archipelago is remarkably abrupt. The distinctive, almost rectangular, shape of northern Luzon is a consequence of the almost simultaneous disappearance near 18°N of the Central Cordillera, the much narrower Sierra Madre, and the broad floodplain of the Cagayan River. The floodplain is underlain by a deep sedimentary basin that is closed off just inland of the coast by an ENE-WSW structural high known as the Sicalao Ridge. Gravity surveys show that the ridge has steep flanks that are almost certainly defined by faulting. In the same region, there is also a dramatic change in the Luzon Arc, which is the volcanic expression of subduction of the South China Sea. The volcanic centers in the Central Cordillera (the North Luzon Segment of the arc) are all now inactive, but further north eruptions are frequent on the small eastern islands of the Bashi Segment. The differences between the North Luzon and Bashi segments suggest that they had very different geological histories until the late Neogene, but the evolution of northern Luzon is so poorly understood that it is not even known on which plate it originated. New paleomagnetic data and the existence of the Sicalao Ridge provide important constraints on reconstructions and, when combined with geological data, favor the possibility that in the Paleogene the Central Cordillera and Sierra Madre were combined as parts of an arc at the southern margin of the Philippine Sea. The Sicalao Ridge can be interpreted as a rift margin feature created during the detachment of Luzon from continental Sundaland. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTectonicsen_HK
dc.rightsTectonics . Copyright © American Geophysical Union.en_HK
dc.titlePeculiar geometry of northern Luzon, Philippines: Implications for regional tectonics of new gravity and paleomagnetic dataen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0278-7407&volume=25&spage=TC4017.&epage=&date=2006&atitle=Peculiar+geometry+of+northern+Luzon,+Philippines:+implications+for+regional+tectonics+of+new+gravity+and+paleomagnetic+data.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailAli, JR:jrali@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAli, JR=rp00659en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2005TC001930en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845745335en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros133643en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845745335&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240103500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMilsom, J=7103121479en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAli, JR=7102266465en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQueano, KL=8365921900en_HK

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