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Article: Environmental history, palaeoecology and human activity at the early Neolithic forager/cultivator site at Kuahuqiao, Hangzhou, eastern China

TitleEnvironmental history, palaeoecology and human activity at the early Neolithic forager/cultivator site at Kuahuqiao, Hangzhou, eastern China
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/quascirev
Citation
Quaternary Science Reviews, 2009, v. 28 n. 23-24, p. 2277-2294 How to Cite?
AbstractThe date and location of the adoption of rice cultivation by foraging cultures in China are of considerable current interest but its understanding is hampered by lack of information regarding its palaeoenvironmental context. We present detailed multi-proxy palaeoecological research at the earliest-dated site of rice cultivation in the coastal littoral of east China which has revealed the precise environmental setting of this early Neolithic settlement and its incipient cultivation at ca 7750 cal BP. Regional and local environmental changes governed the character of the site and the duration of human activity. After an episode of marine conditions, natural hydrological succession and terrestrialisation of the site preceded fire clearance of marsh fen-carr alder scrub that prepared the ground for cultivation and then maintained a reedswamp-type wet grassland in which rice was grown. Cropping of Typha stands may have formed part of the subsistence base before the site was overwhelmed by marine inundation ca 7200 cal BP, after which rice cultivation spread to Neolithic sites of Hemudu type elsewhere in the coastal lowlands. We suggest that integrated multi-proxy palaeoecological studies are vitally important for the full understanding of such key wetland archaeological sites. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72487
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.521
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.928
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Leverhulme Trust, UKF/000128/AL
Funding Information:

This research is supported by the Leverhulme Trust, UK under project number F/000128/AL. We thank Baocheng Zhao, Fengling Yu, and members of the Xiaoshan Museum for their assistance in fieldwork.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorInnes, JBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZong, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Hen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:42:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:42:18Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationQuaternary Science Reviews, 2009, v. 28 n. 23-24, p. 2277-2294en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0277-3791en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72487-
dc.description.abstractThe date and location of the adoption of rice cultivation by foraging cultures in China are of considerable current interest but its understanding is hampered by lack of information regarding its palaeoenvironmental context. We present detailed multi-proxy palaeoecological research at the earliest-dated site of rice cultivation in the coastal littoral of east China which has revealed the precise environmental setting of this early Neolithic settlement and its incipient cultivation at ca 7750 cal BP. Regional and local environmental changes governed the character of the site and the duration of human activity. After an episode of marine conditions, natural hydrological succession and terrestrialisation of the site preceded fire clearance of marsh fen-carr alder scrub that prepared the ground for cultivation and then maintained a reedswamp-type wet grassland in which rice was grown. Cropping of Typha stands may have formed part of the subsistence base before the site was overwhelmed by marine inundation ca 7200 cal BP, after which rice cultivation spread to Neolithic sites of Hemudu type elsewhere in the coastal lowlands. We suggest that integrated multi-proxy palaeoecological studies are vitally important for the full understanding of such key wetland archaeological sites. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/quascireven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofQuaternary Science Reviewsen_HK
dc.titleEnvironmental history, palaeoecology and human activity at the early Neolithic forager/cultivator site at Kuahuqiao, Hangzhou, eastern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0277-3791&volume=28&spage=1&epage=18&date=2009&atitle=Environmental+history,+palaeoecology+and+human+activity+at+the+early+Neolithic+forager/cultivator+site+at+Kuahuqiao,+Hangzhou,+eastern+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZong, Y:yqzong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZong, Y=rp00846en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.04.010en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349148578en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros160713en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349148578&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue23-24en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2277en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2294en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1873-457X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271335400003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridInnes, JB=7102004815en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZong, Y=7005203454en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, Z=35209923100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, C=35111034200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Z=8888585200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, H=8599896600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5295226-

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