File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The origin and tectonic setting of ophiolites in China

TitleThe origin and tectonic setting of ophiolites in China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Classification
Composition
Emplacement
Lithology
Ophiolites
Tectonic environment
Issue Date2008
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaes
Citation
Journal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 2008, v. 32 n. 5-6, p. 301-307 How to Cite?
AbstractOphiolites are key features for unravelling the geologic history of orogenic belts, especially in China, which was formed by amalgamation of numerous tectonic blocks from Precambrian time to the present. Although much has been learned about ophiolites over the last 30 years, questions remain as to their definition, composition, classification, origin and tectonic significance. Most ophiolites, particularly those in China are incomplete bodies composed of serpentinized peridotite, minor cumulate rocks and sparse pillow lavas. Sheeted dikes are rare in most ophiolites and the structural relationships between the different lithologies are commonly unclear. Such bodies should be considered 'possible' ophiolites unless the lithologies can be clearly linked structurally or compositionally. The former classifications of ophiolites into Cordilleran- or Tethyan-types and Harzburgite- or Lherzolite-types have been superseded by a more process-oriented classification proposed by Dilek (2003) that relates them to different magmatic and tectonic processes. This classification makes it easier to reconstruct paleoenvironments and processes in the geologic record. Although ophiolites were originally interpreted as fragments of normal ocean lithosphere, most such bodies have been shown to contain clear suprasubduction zone geochemical fingerprints. Some ophiolites consist entirely of suprasubduction zone components whereas others are compound bodies formed originally at mid-ocean spreading centers and then modified by later suprasubduction zone melts. Percolation of suprasubduction zone melts through the overlying mantle wedge can produce dunite pods and dikes, commonly associated with podiform chromitites, and may be responsible for the formation of transitional zone dunites. Ophiolite emplacement is thought to require subduction of lower density material beneath the body, a process that is easy to explain in subduction zone environments. Emplacement can occur either during subduction rollback or by final closure of the ocean basin in which the ophiolite formed. Much new work on Chinese ophiolites is currently underway and new interpretations of these bodies are being developed. This Special Issue presents the results of recent studies of ophiolites from most of the major orogenic belts in China. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72419
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.647
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.393
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Mfen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:41:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:41:37Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 2008, v. 32 n. 5-6, p. 301-307en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1367-9120en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72419-
dc.description.abstractOphiolites are key features for unravelling the geologic history of orogenic belts, especially in China, which was formed by amalgamation of numerous tectonic blocks from Precambrian time to the present. Although much has been learned about ophiolites over the last 30 years, questions remain as to their definition, composition, classification, origin and tectonic significance. Most ophiolites, particularly those in China are incomplete bodies composed of serpentinized peridotite, minor cumulate rocks and sparse pillow lavas. Sheeted dikes are rare in most ophiolites and the structural relationships between the different lithologies are commonly unclear. Such bodies should be considered 'possible' ophiolites unless the lithologies can be clearly linked structurally or compositionally. The former classifications of ophiolites into Cordilleran- or Tethyan-types and Harzburgite- or Lherzolite-types have been superseded by a more process-oriented classification proposed by Dilek (2003) that relates them to different magmatic and tectonic processes. This classification makes it easier to reconstruct paleoenvironments and processes in the geologic record. Although ophiolites were originally interpreted as fragments of normal ocean lithosphere, most such bodies have been shown to contain clear suprasubduction zone geochemical fingerprints. Some ophiolites consist entirely of suprasubduction zone components whereas others are compound bodies formed originally at mid-ocean spreading centers and then modified by later suprasubduction zone melts. Percolation of suprasubduction zone melts through the overlying mantle wedge can produce dunite pods and dikes, commonly associated with podiform chromitites, and may be responsible for the formation of transitional zone dunites. Ophiolite emplacement is thought to require subduction of lower density material beneath the body, a process that is easy to explain in subduction zone environments. Emplacement can occur either during subduction rollback or by final closure of the ocean basin in which the ophiolite formed. Much new work on Chinese ophiolites is currently underway and new interpretations of these bodies are being developed. This Special Issue presents the results of recent studies of ophiolites from most of the major orogenic belts in China. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaesen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Asian Earth Sciencesen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectClassificationen_HK
dc.subjectCompositionen_HK
dc.subjectEmplacementen_HK
dc.subjectLithologyen_HK
dc.subjectOphiolitesen_HK
dc.subjectTectonic environmenten_HK
dc.titleThe origin and tectonic setting of ophiolites in Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1367-9120&volume=32&issue=5-6&spage=301&epage=307&date=2008&atitle=The+origin+and+tectonic+setting+of+ophiolites+in+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhou, Mf:mfzhou@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, Mf=rp00844en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jseaes.2007.11.014en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-41849100743en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros167305en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros144294-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-41849100743&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume32en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5-6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage301en_HK
dc.identifier.epage307en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256265700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRobinson, PT=7403720506en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, Mf=7403506005en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats