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Article: White matter volume and anisotropy in preterm children: A pilot study of neurocognitive correlates
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TitleWhite matter volume and anisotropy in preterm children: A pilot study of neurocognitive correlates
 
AuthorsYung, A1
Poon, G1
Qiu, DQ1
Chu, J2
Lam, B1
Leung, C1
Goh, W1
Khong, PL1
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/
 
CitationPediatric Research, 2007, v. 61 n. 6, p. 732-736 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/pdr.0b013e31805365db
 
AbstractThe objectives of this study were to evaluate the differences in whole brain white matter (WM) volume and anisotropy between preterm and term children and to determine the relationships with cognitive outcome. Twenty-five low birth weight (BW), preterm, neurologically normal children between 8.8 and 11.5 y of age were recruited for volumetric and diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI), together with 13 age-matched term control subjects. Subsequent intelligence quotient (IQ) testing was performed for 21 preterm children within 6 mo of imaging studies. We computed the mean volume and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the whole brain WM and compared the differences between the two groups. Mean WM volume and FA were significantly lower in the preterm group (p = 0.014 and p < 0.001, respectively). Multiple regression analysis found both WM volume and FA to be independent variables significantly affecting full scale IQ (FSIQ) (r = 0.407, p = 0.021 and r = 0.496, p = 0.005, respectively) after adjusting for BW, gestational age (GA), and gender. In the evaluation of the whole brain WM of preterm children, we found that both volume and FA remain reduced at late childhood with both parameters significantly affecting long-term cognitive outcome. © International Pediatrics Research Foundation, Inc. 2007. All Rights Reserved.
 
ISSN0031-3998
2012 Impact Factor: 2.673
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.153
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1203/pdr.0b013e31805365db
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000246787300020
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYung, A
 
dc.contributor.authorPoon, G
 
dc.contributor.authorQiu, DQ
 
dc.contributor.authorChu, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, B
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, C
 
dc.contributor.authorGoh, W
 
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:41:21Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:41:21Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this study were to evaluate the differences in whole brain white matter (WM) volume and anisotropy between preterm and term children and to determine the relationships with cognitive outcome. Twenty-five low birth weight (BW), preterm, neurologically normal children between 8.8 and 11.5 y of age were recruited for volumetric and diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI), together with 13 age-matched term control subjects. Subsequent intelligence quotient (IQ) testing was performed for 21 preterm children within 6 mo of imaging studies. We computed the mean volume and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the whole brain WM and compared the differences between the two groups. Mean WM volume and FA were significantly lower in the preterm group (p = 0.014 and p < 0.001, respectively). Multiple regression analysis found both WM volume and FA to be independent variables significantly affecting full scale IQ (FSIQ) (r = 0.407, p = 0.021 and r = 0.496, p = 0.005, respectively) after adjusting for BW, gestational age (GA), and gender. In the evaluation of the whole brain WM of preterm children, we found that both volume and FA remain reduced at late childhood with both parameters significantly affecting long-term cognitive outcome. © International Pediatrics Research Foundation, Inc. 2007. All Rights Reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Research, 2007, v. 61 n. 6, p. 732-736 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/pdr.0b013e31805365db
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1203/pdr.0b013e31805365db
 
dc.identifier.epage736
 
dc.identifier.hkuros128334
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246787300020
 
dc.identifier.issn0031-3998
2012 Impact Factor: 2.673
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.153
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid17426647
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34249058942
 
dc.identifier.spage732
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72401
 
dc.identifier.volume61
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Research
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsPediatric Research. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
 
dc.subject.meshBirth Weight
 
dc.subject.meshBrain - anatomy & histology
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshCognition
 
dc.subject.meshDiffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn
 
dc.subject.meshInfant, Premature - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshInfant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshPilot Projects
 
dc.titleWhite matter volume and anisotropy in preterm children: A pilot study of neurocognitive correlates
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Center Child Development