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Article: High-Resolution CT Findings of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome at Presentation and after Admission
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TitleHigh-Resolution CT Findings of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome at Presentation and after Admission
 
AuthorsMüller, NL2
Ooi, GC1
Khong, PL1
Zhou, LJ1
Tsang, KWT1
Nicolaou, S2
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherAmerican Roentgen Ray Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arrs.org/scriptcontent/ajr/index.cfm
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Roentgenology, 2004, v. 182 n. 1, p. 39-44 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractOBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to assess the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings at presentation and after hospital admission in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). MATERIALS AND METHODS. We reviewed the HRCT findings at presentation (n = 12) and after hospital admission (n = 25) of 29 patients with SARS and compared the HRCT findings with the radiographic findings. HRCT scans were obtained using 1-mm (n = 28) or 2-mm (n = 1) collimation. The radiographs and HRCT scans were reviewed independently by two observers who reached a decision by consensus, RESULTS. All patients had abnormal findings on HRCT at presentation. Eight of these 12 patients had normal findings on radiographs. The predominant HRCT findings at presentation consisted of unilateral (n = 6) or bilateral (n = 2) ground-glass opacities or focal unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 2) areas of consolidation. All patients showed progression of disease on follow-up. The predominant HRCT findings on follow-up CT scans consisted of unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral ground-glass opacities (n = 13), unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral consolidation (n = 5), or a mixed bilateral pattern of ground-glass attenuation, consolidation, and reticulation (n = 3). Reticulation with associated architectural distortion and mild traction bronchiectasis was present in eight patients. CONCLUSION. HRCT can show parenchymal abnormalities in patients with SARS who have normal findings on radiographs at presentation. Follow-up CT scans obtained in hospitalized patients show findings consistent with fibrosis in a small percentage of patients.
 
ISSN0361-803X
2013 Impact Factor: 2.744
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000188495900016
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMüller, NL
 
dc.contributor.authorOoi, GC
 
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, LJ
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KWT
 
dc.contributor.authorNicolaou, S
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:41:20Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:41:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to assess the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings at presentation and after hospital admission in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). MATERIALS AND METHODS. We reviewed the HRCT findings at presentation (n = 12) and after hospital admission (n = 25) of 29 patients with SARS and compared the HRCT findings with the radiographic findings. HRCT scans were obtained using 1-mm (n = 28) or 2-mm (n = 1) collimation. The radiographs and HRCT scans were reviewed independently by two observers who reached a decision by consensus, RESULTS. All patients had abnormal findings on HRCT at presentation. Eight of these 12 patients had normal findings on radiographs. The predominant HRCT findings at presentation consisted of unilateral (n = 6) or bilateral (n = 2) ground-glass opacities or focal unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 2) areas of consolidation. All patients showed progression of disease on follow-up. The predominant HRCT findings on follow-up CT scans consisted of unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral ground-glass opacities (n = 13), unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral consolidation (n = 5), or a mixed bilateral pattern of ground-glass attenuation, consolidation, and reticulation (n = 3). Reticulation with associated architectural distortion and mild traction bronchiectasis was present in eight patients. CONCLUSION. HRCT can show parenchymal abnormalities in patients with SARS who have normal findings on radiographs at presentation. Follow-up CT scans obtained in hospitalized patients show findings consistent with fibrosis in a small percentage of patients.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Roentgenology, 2004, v. 182 n. 1, p. 39-44 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage44
 
dc.identifier.hkuros88041
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000188495900016
 
dc.identifier.issn0361-803X
2013 Impact Factor: 2.744
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid14684509
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0348142041
 
dc.identifier.spage39
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72400
 
dc.identifier.volume182
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Roentgen Ray Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arrs.org/scriptcontent/ajr/index.cfm
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
 
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Tests, Routine
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPatient Admission
 
dc.subject.meshRadiography, Thoracic
 
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - radiography
 
dc.subject.meshTime Factors
 
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed
 
dc.titleHigh-Resolution CT Findings of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome at Presentation and after Admission
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Khong, PL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhou, LJ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsang, KWT</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Nicolaou, S</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. The University of British Columbia