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Article: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Radiographic Evaluation and Clinical Outcome Measures
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TitleSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Radiographic Evaluation and Clinical Outcome Measures
 
AuthorsOoi, CGC1
Khong, PL1
Ho, JCM1
Lam, B1
Wong, WM1
Yiu, WC2
Wong, PC1
Wong, CF1
Lai, KN1
Tsang, KWT1
 
KeywordsLung, infection
Oxygen
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
 
Issue Date2003
 
PublisherRadiological Society of North America, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://radiology.rsnajnls.org
 
CitationRadiology, 2003, v. 229 n. 2, p. 500-506 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2292030737
 
AbstractPURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship among chest radiographs, oxygen supplementation requirement, and treatment response in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty patients (20 women, 20 men; mean age, 42.90 years ± 14.01 [SD]; median age, 41.5 years; age range, 25-82 years) with SARS were evaluated. Daily chest radiographs were graded according to percentage of lung involvement during 20.15 days ± 5.56 (median, 20 days; range, 14-38 days). Times between symptoms and treatment and time to reach maximal radiographic score from admission and treatment day were determined. Daily oxygen saturation (Sao2) and oxygen supplementation including mechanically assisted ventilation were recorded. Treatment response was defined as good, fair, and poor. Patterns of radiographic opacity at admission and at maximal radiographic score were noted. Differences in radiographic and clinical parameters with respect to oxygen supplementation and treatment response were respectively evaluated with Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. RESULTS: Larger maximal radiographic scores, lower Sao2 at maximal radiographic change, longer time from treatment to maximal radiographic score (P < .01), and diffuse consolidation at maximal radiographic score were associated with oxygen supplementation. Parameters that influenced treatment response were time from symptom onset to treatment day (P = .003), time from admission to treatment day (P < .001), time to maximal radiographic score from treatment day (P = .001), maximal radiographic score (P = .009), Sao2 at maximal radiographic score (P = .13), and treatment radiographic score (P = .03). Fair responders had shorter time between admission and treatment than did either good (P < .001) or poor responders (P = .002) and shorter time between symptoms and treatment (P < .001) and lower treatment radiographic score (P = .012) than did good responders. Good (82%), poor (36%), and fair (33%) responders developed maximal chest radiographic scores within 4 days of treatment (P = .008). Radiographic patterns at both admission and maximal radiographic score did not influence treatment response. CONCLUSION: There are significant relationships among radiographic parameters, oxygen supplementation, and treatment response, and these relationships appear to be clinically useful in the treatment of SARS. © RSNA, 2003.
 
ISSN0033-8419
2013 Impact Factor: 6.214
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2292030737
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000186169700030
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorOoi, CGC
 
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, JCM
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, B
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorYiu, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, PC
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, CF
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, KN
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KWT
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:41:20Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:41:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2003
 
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship among chest radiographs, oxygen supplementation requirement, and treatment response in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty patients (20 women, 20 men; mean age, 42.90 years ± 14.01 [SD]; median age, 41.5 years; age range, 25-82 years) with SARS were evaluated. Daily chest radiographs were graded according to percentage of lung involvement during 20.15 days ± 5.56 (median, 20 days; range, 14-38 days). Times between symptoms and treatment and time to reach maximal radiographic score from admission and treatment day were determined. Daily oxygen saturation (Sao2) and oxygen supplementation including mechanically assisted ventilation were recorded. Treatment response was defined as good, fair, and poor. Patterns of radiographic opacity at admission and at maximal radiographic score were noted. Differences in radiographic and clinical parameters with respect to oxygen supplementation and treatment response were respectively evaluated with Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. RESULTS: Larger maximal radiographic scores, lower Sao2 at maximal radiographic change, longer time from treatment to maximal radiographic score (P < .01), and diffuse consolidation at maximal radiographic score were associated with oxygen supplementation. Parameters that influenced treatment response were time from symptom onset to treatment day (P = .003), time from admission to treatment day (P < .001), time to maximal radiographic score from treatment day (P = .001), maximal radiographic score (P = .009), Sao2 at maximal radiographic score (P = .13), and treatment radiographic score (P = .03). Fair responders had shorter time between admission and treatment than did either good (P < .001) or poor responders (P = .002) and shorter time between symptoms and treatment (P < .001) and lower treatment radiographic score (P = .012) than did good responders. Good (82%), poor (36%), and fair (33%) responders developed maximal chest radiographic scores within 4 days of treatment (P = .008). Radiographic patterns at both admission and maximal radiographic score did not influence treatment response. CONCLUSION: There are significant relationships among radiographic parameters, oxygen supplementation, and treatment response, and these relationships appear to be clinically useful in the treatment of SARS. © RSNA, 2003.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationRadiology, 2003, v. 229 n. 2, p. 500-506 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2292030737
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2292030737
 
dc.identifier.epage506
 
dc.identifier.hkuros87428
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000186169700030
 
dc.identifier.issn0033-8419
2013 Impact Factor: 6.214
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid14595150
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0142241112
 
dc.identifier.spage500
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72399
 
dc.identifier.volume229
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRadiological Society of North America, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://radiology.rsnajnls.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofRadiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLung - radiography
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshOxygen - blood
 
dc.subject.meshOxygen Inhalation Therapy
 
dc.subject.meshRespiration, Artificial
 
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - physiopathology - radiography - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
 
dc.subjectLung, infection
 
dc.subjectOxygen
 
dc.subjectSevere acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
 
dc.titleSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Radiographic Evaluation and Clinical Outcome Measures
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Khong, PL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, JCM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, B</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, WM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yiu, WC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, PC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, CF</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lai, KN</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsang, KWT</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>PURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship among chest radiographs, oxygen supplementation requirement, and treatment response in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty patients (20 women, 20 men; mean age, 42.90 years &#177; 14.01 [SD]; median age, 41.5 years; age range, 25-82 years) with SARS were evaluated. Daily chest radiographs were graded according to percentage of lung involvement during 20.15 days &#177; 5.56 (median, 20 days; range, 14-38 days). Times between symptoms and treatment and time to reach maximal radiographic score from admission and treatment day were determined. Daily oxygen saturation (Sao2) and oxygen supplementation including mechanically assisted ventilation were recorded. Treatment response was defined as good, fair, and poor. Patterns of radiographic opacity at admission and at maximal radiographic score were noted. Differences in radiographic and clinical parameters with respect to oxygen supplementation and treatment response were respectively evaluated with Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. RESULTS: Larger maximal radiographic scores, lower Sao2 at maximal radiographic change, longer time from treatment to maximal radiographic score (P &lt; .01), and diffuse consolidation at maximal radiographic score were associated with oxygen supplementation. Parameters that influenced treatment response were time from symptom onset to treatment day (P = .003), time from admission to treatment day (P &lt; .001), time to maximal radiographic score from treatment day (P = .001), maximal radiographic score (P = .009), Sao2 at maximal radiographic score (P = .13), and treatment radiographic score (P = .03). Fair responders had shorter time between admission and treatment than did either good (P &lt; .001) or poor responders (P = .002) and shorter time between symptoms and treatment (P &lt; .001) and lower treatment radiographic score (P = .012) than did good responders. Good (82%), poor (36%), and fair (33%) responders developed maximal chest radiographic scores within 4 days of treatment (P = .008). Radiographic patterns at both admission and maximal radiographic score did not influence treatment response. CONCLUSION: There are significant relationships among radiographic parameters, oxygen supplementation, and treatment response, and these relationships appear to be clinically useful in the treatment of SARS. &#169; RSNA, 2003.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong