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Article: MR imaging of spinal tumors in children with neurofibromatosis I

TitleMR imaging of spinal tumors in children with neurofibromatosis I
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAmerican Roentgen Ray Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arrs.org/scriptcontent/ajr/index.cfm
Citation
American Journal Of Roentgenology, 2003, v. 180 n. 2, p. 413-417 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE. The need for radiologic surveillance of spinal tumors in children with neurofibromatosis 1 is controversial and unresolved. We aimed to determine the incidence of spinal tumors in asymptomatic patients, describe the imaging findings, and evaluate the clinical usefulness of a prospective MR imaging surveillance program of the spine in children with neurofibromatosis 1. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Of 62 children consecutively seen in a neurofibromatosis 1 clinic, 53 (85.5%) were recruited for MR imaging of the whole spine. All children satisfied the clinical criteria for diagnosis of neurofibromatosis 1. Imaging findings, clinical signs and symptoms, and subsequent clinical management were reviewed. RESULTS. The patients were 35 boys and 18 girls (age range, 11 months-18 years; mean age, 9.6 years), all of whom were asymptomatic, with no remarkable neurologic signs. Seven children (13.2%) had spinal neurofibromas: four had solitary neurofibromas (two dumbbell, one intradural, and one paraspinal tumor) and three had plexiform neurofibromas of the sacral plexus and thoracic and lumbar nerve sheaths. The incidences of scoliosis, localized cutaneous neurofibromas, and massive soft-tissue neurofibromas were 71.4%, 71.4%, and 28.6%, respectively, in the group with spinal neurofibromas (n = 7), and 30.4%, 39.1%, and 8.7%, respectively, in the group without spinal neurofibromas (n = 46). Patient clinical outcome was affected in only one patient (1.9%) in whom a solitary neurofibroma was resected. Follow-up imaging in 10 patients (mean period, 29 months) showed no evidence of tumor occurrence, progression, or recurrence. CONCLUSION. Although benign spinal neurofibromas are not uncommon in asymptomatic children with neurofibromatosis 1, the clinical usefulness of spine surveillance with MR imaging is limited in these children, making its effectiveness questionable.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72390
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.66
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.439
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGoh, WHSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOoi, GCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:41:14Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:41:14Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Roentgenology, 2003, v. 180 n. 2, p. 413-417en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0361-803Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72390-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE. The need for radiologic surveillance of spinal tumors in children with neurofibromatosis 1 is controversial and unresolved. We aimed to determine the incidence of spinal tumors in asymptomatic patients, describe the imaging findings, and evaluate the clinical usefulness of a prospective MR imaging surveillance program of the spine in children with neurofibromatosis 1. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Of 62 children consecutively seen in a neurofibromatosis 1 clinic, 53 (85.5%) were recruited for MR imaging of the whole spine. All children satisfied the clinical criteria for diagnosis of neurofibromatosis 1. Imaging findings, clinical signs and symptoms, and subsequent clinical management were reviewed. RESULTS. The patients were 35 boys and 18 girls (age range, 11 months-18 years; mean age, 9.6 years), all of whom were asymptomatic, with no remarkable neurologic signs. Seven children (13.2%) had spinal neurofibromas: four had solitary neurofibromas (two dumbbell, one intradural, and one paraspinal tumor) and three had plexiform neurofibromas of the sacral plexus and thoracic and lumbar nerve sheaths. The incidences of scoliosis, localized cutaneous neurofibromas, and massive soft-tissue neurofibromas were 71.4%, 71.4%, and 28.6%, respectively, in the group with spinal neurofibromas (n = 7), and 30.4%, 39.1%, and 8.7%, respectively, in the group without spinal neurofibromas (n = 46). Patient clinical outcome was affected in only one patient (1.9%) in whom a solitary neurofibroma was resected. Follow-up imaging in 10 patients (mean period, 29 months) showed no evidence of tumor occurrence, progression, or recurrence. CONCLUSION. Although benign spinal neurofibromas are not uncommon in asymptomatic children with neurofibromatosis 1, the clinical usefulness of spine surveillance with MR imaging is limited in these children, making its effectiveness questionable.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Roentgen Ray Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arrs.org/scriptcontent/ajr/index.cfmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Roentgenologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeurofibromatosis 1 - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Nervous System Neoplasms - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpinal Cord - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpinal Cord Neoplasms - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpinal Nerves - pathologyen_HK
dc.titleMR imaging of spinal tumors in children with neurofibromatosis Ien_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0361-803X&volume=180&issue=2&spage=413&epage=417&date=2003&atitle=MR+Imaging+of+Spinal+Tumors+in+Children+with+Neurofibromatosis+Ien_HK
dc.identifier.emailKhong, PL:plkhong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKhong, PL=rp00467en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid12540444-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037305406en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros80265en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037305406&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume180en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage413en_HK
dc.identifier.epage417en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000180753200023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhong, PL=7006693233en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoh, WHS=7005651404en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, CW=7102443761en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOoi, GC=7006176119en_HK

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