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Article: T2-weighted hyperintensities (unidentified bright objects) in children with neurofibromatosis 1: Their impact on cognitive function

TitleT2-weighted hyperintensities (unidentified bright objects) in children with neurofibromatosis 1: Their impact on cognitive function
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcn.sagepub.com
Citation
Journal Of Child Neurology, 2004, v. 19 n. 11, p. 853-858 How to Cite?
AbstractThe impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-identified T2-weighted hyperintensities (unidentified bright objects) on the cognitive function of children with neurofibromatosis 1 is controversial. We recruited 32 right-handed children with neurofibromatosis 1 (22 boys, 10 girls) aged between 5 and 16 years (mean age 10.2 years) for magnetic resonance imaging examinations and neuropsychologic evaluation. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of the hyperintensities. Twenty-four children had unidentified bright objects, whereas eight children did not. Using the t-test, thalamic lesions were associated with lower intellectual function (P = .031). Left globus pallidus hyperintensities were associated with a lower attention score (P = .04), and right middle cerebellar peduncle hyperintensities were associated with a lower sensorimotor score (P = .05). The size of the thalamic lesions correlated with cognitive function (P < .05). Among the group with unidentified bright objects, there was a significant association between more involved sites on the dominant hemisphere and impaired verbal function (r = -.55; P = .005). Unidentified bright objects in the thalamus, globus pallidus, and middle cerebellar peduncles and the laterality of the lesions had an impact on cognitive function.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72348
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.434
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.694
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGoh, WHSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:40:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:40:47Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Child Neurology, 2004, v. 19 n. 11, p. 853-858en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0883-0738en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72348-
dc.description.abstractThe impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-identified T2-weighted hyperintensities (unidentified bright objects) on the cognitive function of children with neurofibromatosis 1 is controversial. We recruited 32 right-handed children with neurofibromatosis 1 (22 boys, 10 girls) aged between 5 and 16 years (mean age 10.2 years) for magnetic resonance imaging examinations and neuropsychologic evaluation. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of the hyperintensities. Twenty-four children had unidentified bright objects, whereas eight children did not. Using the t-test, thalamic lesions were associated with lower intellectual function (P = .031). Left globus pallidus hyperintensities were associated with a lower attention score (P = .04), and right middle cerebellar peduncle hyperintensities were associated with a lower sensorimotor score (P = .05). The size of the thalamic lesions correlated with cognitive function (P < .05). Among the group with unidentified bright objects, there was a significant association between more involved sites on the dominant hemisphere and impaired verbal function (r = -.55; P = .005). Unidentified bright objects in the thalamus, globus pallidus, and middle cerebellar peduncles and the laterality of the lesions had an impact on cognitive function.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcn.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Neurologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshBrain - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCerebellum - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshDominance, Cerebral - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGlobus Pallidus - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIntellectual Disability - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshIntelligence - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeurofibromatosis 1 - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeurologic Examinationen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshThalamus - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshWechsler Scalesen_HK
dc.titleT2-weighted hyperintensities (unidentified bright objects) in children with neurofibromatosis 1: Their impact on cognitive functionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0883-0738&volume=19&issue=11&spage=853&epage=858&date=2004&atitle=T2-Weighted+Hyperintensities+(Unidentified+Bright+Objects)+in+Children+With+Neurofibromatosis+1:+Their+Impact+on+Cognitive+Functionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKhong, PL:plkhong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKhong, PL=rp00467en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid15658789en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-11844276586en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97098en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-11844276586&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage853en_HK
dc.identifier.epage858en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228703600002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoh, WHS=7005651404en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhong, PL=7006693233en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, CSY=8206219600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK

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