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Article: Tuberous sclerosis complex: Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with comorbidities

TitleTuberous sclerosis complex: Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with comorbidities
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcn.sagepub.com
Citation
Journal Of Child Neurology, 2006, v. 21 n. 2, p. 99-105 How to Cite?
AbstractWe studied the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a cohort of Chinese children with tuberous sclerosis complex to determine the relationship between age, sex, mental retardation, autism, epilepsy, infantile spasm, and early age at onset of seizures and the numbers and locations of tubers detected. We searched our tuberous sclerosis registry, established in 1985 (N = 44), and performed an analysis of children who had MRIs of the brain performed (n = 22). A neuroradiologist blinded to the clinical findings scored the MRIs according to the total number and site of the tubers. The following factors were analyzed: age, sex, presence of autism (n = 7), presence (n = 19) and severity of mental retardation (mild [n = 12], moderate to severe [n = 7]), presence of epilepsy (n = 21) or infantile spasm (n = 8), and age at onset of seizures less than 1 year (n = 10). There was no significant relationship between the number and site of tubers and the following factors: sex, autism, mental retardation, degree of mental retardation, epilepsy, history of infantile spasm, or age at onset of seizures less than 1 year. Only the presence of cortical tubers in the parietal regions had a significant relationship with the history of infantile spasm (P = .012). Using multiple regression analysis of all of the risk factors, only age is related to the number of tubers in the MRI (P = .047), and a history of infantile spasm is related to the presence of tubers in the parietal (P = .009) and occipital (P = .031) lobes. The associated comorbidities in tuberous sclerosis complex might be explained by more complex underlying genetic or pathologic issues rather than purely by the site of the cortical tubers. We suggest that a developmental approach, by analyzing the age at the appearance of tubers in both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases with the development of other neuropsychiatric comorbidities, should be undertaken to assess the causal relationship.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72336
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.434
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.694
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:40:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:40:39Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Child Neurology, 2006, v. 21 n. 2, p. 99-105en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0883-0738en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72336-
dc.description.abstractWe studied the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a cohort of Chinese children with tuberous sclerosis complex to determine the relationship between age, sex, mental retardation, autism, epilepsy, infantile spasm, and early age at onset of seizures and the numbers and locations of tubers detected. We searched our tuberous sclerosis registry, established in 1985 (N = 44), and performed an analysis of children who had MRIs of the brain performed (n = 22). A neuroradiologist blinded to the clinical findings scored the MRIs according to the total number and site of the tubers. The following factors were analyzed: age, sex, presence of autism (n = 7), presence (n = 19) and severity of mental retardation (mild [n = 12], moderate to severe [n = 7]), presence of epilepsy (n = 21) or infantile spasm (n = 8), and age at onset of seizures less than 1 year (n = 10). There was no significant relationship between the number and site of tubers and the following factors: sex, autism, mental retardation, degree of mental retardation, epilepsy, history of infantile spasm, or age at onset of seizures less than 1 year. Only the presence of cortical tubers in the parietal regions had a significant relationship with the history of infantile spasm (P = .012). Using multiple regression analysis of all of the risk factors, only age is related to the number of tubers in the MRI (P = .047), and a history of infantile spasm is related to the presence of tubers in the parietal (P = .009) and occipital (P = .031) lobes. The associated comorbidities in tuberous sclerosis complex might be explained by more complex underlying genetic or pathologic issues rather than purely by the site of the cortical tubers. We suggest that a developmental approach, by analyzing the age at the appearance of tubers in both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases with the development of other neuropsychiatric comorbidities, should be undertaken to assess the causal relationship.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcn.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Neurologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen_HK
dc.subject.meshEpilepsy - diagnosis - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshIntellectual Disability - diagnosis - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshRegistriesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpasms, Infantile - diagnosis - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshStatistics as Topicen_HK
dc.subject.meshTuberous Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - geneticsen_HK
dc.titleTuberous sclerosis complex: Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with comorbiditiesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0883-0738&volume=21&issue=2&spage=99&epage=105&date=2006&atitle=Tuberous+Sclerosis+Complex:+Correlation+of+Magnetic+Resonance+Imaging+(MRI)+Findings+with+Comorbiditiesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKhong, PK:plkhong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKhong, PK=rp00467en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/08830738060210020901en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16566871-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646841792en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115978en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646841792&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage99en_HK
dc.identifier.epage105en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237831900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhong, PK=7006693233en_HK

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