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Article: Cultural influences on sharer and recipient behavior: Sharing in Chinese and Indian preschool children

TitleCultural influences on sharer and recipient behavior: Sharing in Chinese and Indian preschool children
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=197
Citation
Journal Of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1999, v. 30 n. 2, p. 219-241 How to Cite?
AbstractSeventy-two 4-year-old Chinese and Indian children were paired with a friend and with an acquaintance in their class. One child (sharer) was given 10 pieces each of his or her preferred and nonpreferred foods, whereas the partner (recipient) was given one piece of each of the same foods. Sharing incidents were classified to indicate whether they were initiated by the sharer (spontaneous sharing) or due to the recipients' behavior (elicited and passive sharing). Friendship did not influence either the quantity or quality of sharing. Results indicated that young Asian children were more likely to share spontaneously and less likely to elicit sharing. Chinese children showed more spontaneous sharing than did Indian children; the majority of sharing incidents in the Indian sample were classified as passive sharing. Findings highlight the importance of cultural beliefs on young children's behavior and of considering the interactive effects of the sharers' and recipients' behaviors on each other.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72138
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.795
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.308
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRao, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStewart, SMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:38:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:38:48Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1999, v. 30 n. 2, p. 219-241en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-0221en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/72138-
dc.description.abstractSeventy-two 4-year-old Chinese and Indian children were paired with a friend and with an acquaintance in their class. One child (sharer) was given 10 pieces each of his or her preferred and nonpreferred foods, whereas the partner (recipient) was given one piece of each of the same foods. Sharing incidents were classified to indicate whether they were initiated by the sharer (spontaneous sharing) or due to the recipients' behavior (elicited and passive sharing). Friendship did not influence either the quantity or quality of sharing. Results indicated that young Asian children were more likely to share spontaneously and less likely to elicit sharing. Chinese children showed more spontaneous sharing than did Indian children; the majority of sharing incidents in the Indian sample were classified as passive sharing. Findings highlight the importance of cultural beliefs on young children's behavior and of considering the interactive effects of the sharers' and recipients' behaviors on each other.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=197en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleCultural influences on sharer and recipient behavior: Sharing in Chinese and Indian preschool childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailRao, N: nrao@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRao, N=rp00953en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033443444en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros44557en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033443444&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage219en_HK
dc.identifier.epage241en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRao, N=7401628868en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStewart, SM=35460013800en_HK

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