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Article: Recurrent Chromosomal Imbalances in Nonsmall Cell Lung Carcinoma: The Association between 1q Amplification and Tumor Recurrence
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TitleRecurrent Chromosomal Imbalances in Nonsmall Cell Lung Carcinoma: The Association between 1q Amplification and Tumor Recurrence
 
AuthorsTai, ALS1
Yan, WS2
Fang, Y2
Xie, D1
Sham, JST1
Guan, XY1
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28741
 
CitationCancer, 2004, v. 100 n. 9, p. 1918-1927 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20190
 
AbstractBACKGROUND. Lung carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. To better understand this disease, the authors studied genetic alterations in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and the association between genetic changes and clinical features. METHODS. Genetic alterations in 30 patients with adenocarcinoma (AC) and 39 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization. The genetic changes in patients with AC and SCC were compared and the associations of these changes with clinical features were studied. RESULTS. A gain of 3q with a minimal amplified region at 3q25.3-qter was significantly higher in patients with SCC compared with patients with AC (72% vs. 27%; P < 0.001). A gain of 20q and loss of chromosome 9 were detected more frequently in patients with AC compared with patients with SCC (P < 0.05). Gains of 5p and 20q and loss of 5q were significantly correlated with an advanced stage of NSCLC (P < 0.05). Amplification of 1q was significantly associated with NSCLC recurrence (P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS. The results of the current study suggested that different chromosomal aberrations may contribute to the types and pathologic stages of NSCLC. © 2004 American Cancer Society.
 
ISSN0008-543X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.901
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20190
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000220929000019
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTai, ALS
 
dc.contributor.authorYan, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorFang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorXie, D
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, JST
 
dc.contributor.authorGuan, XY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:36:28Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:36:28Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND. Lung carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. To better understand this disease, the authors studied genetic alterations in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and the association between genetic changes and clinical features. METHODS. Genetic alterations in 30 patients with adenocarcinoma (AC) and 39 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization. The genetic changes in patients with AC and SCC were compared and the associations of these changes with clinical features were studied. RESULTS. A gain of 3q with a minimal amplified region at 3q25.3-qter was significantly higher in patients with SCC compared with patients with AC (72% vs. 27%; P < 0.001). A gain of 20q and loss of chromosome 9 were detected more frequently in patients with AC compared with patients with SCC (P < 0.05). Gains of 5p and 20q and loss of 5q were significantly correlated with an advanced stage of NSCLC (P < 0.05). Amplification of 1q was significantly associated with NSCLC recurrence (P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS. The results of the current study suggested that different chromosomal aberrations may contribute to the types and pathologic stages of NSCLC. © 2004 American Cancer Society.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationCancer, 2004, v. 100 n. 9, p. 1918-1927 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20190
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20190
 
dc.identifier.epage1927
 
dc.identifier.hkuros115339
 
dc.identifier.hkuros96139
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220929000019
 
dc.identifier.issn0008-543X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.901
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid15112273
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1942499002
 
dc.identifier.spage1918
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71917
 
dc.identifier.volume100
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28741
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofCancer
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCancer. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma - genetics - mortality - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshBlotting, Southern
 
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - genetics - mortality - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Squamous Cell - genetics - mortality - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshChromosome Aberrations
 
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
 
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapy
 
dc.subject.meshDNA, Neoplasm - analysis
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms - genetics - mortality - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshNucleic Acid Hybridization
 
dc.subject.meshProbability
 
dc.subject.meshPrognosis
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment
 
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificity
 
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis
 
dc.titleRecurrent Chromosomal Imbalances in Nonsmall Cell Lung Carcinoma: The Association between 1q Amplification and Tumor Recurrence
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Sun Yat-Sen University