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Article: Physical hydrography and algal bloom transport in Hong Kong waters

TitlePhysical hydrography and algal bloom transport in Hong Kong waters
Authors
KeywordsDrogue tracking
Environmental hydraulics
Eutrophication
Fish kill
Harmful algal blooms
Hydrodynamic modelling
Mariculture
Red tide
Water quality
Wind-induced transport
Issue Date2005
PublisherHaiyang Chubanshe.
Citation
China Ocean Engineering, 2005, v. 19 n. 4, p. 539-556 How to Cite?
AbstractIn sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, algal blooms and red tides are usually first sighted in the Mirs Bay, in the eastern waters of Hong Kong. A calibrated three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the Pearl River Estuary (Delft3D) has been applied to the study of the physical hydrography of Hong Kong waters and its relationship with algal bloom transport patterns in the dry and wet seasons. The general 3D hydrodynamic circulation and salinity structure in the partially-mixed estuary are presented. Extensive numerical surface drogue tracking experiments are performed for algal blooms that are initiated in the Mirs Bay under different seasonal, wind and tidal conditions. The probability of bloom impact on the Victoria Harbour and nearby urban coastal waters is estimated. The computations show that: i) In the wet season (May-August), algal blooms initiated in the Mirs Bay will move in a clockwise direction out of the bay, and be transported away from Hong Kong due to SW monsoon winds which drive the SW to NE coastal current; ii) In the dry season (November-April), algal blooms initiated in the northeast Mirs Bay will move in an anti-clockwise direction and be carried away into southern waters due to the NE to SW coastal current driven by the NE monsoon winds; the bloom typically flows past the east edge of the Victoria Harbour and nearby waters. Finally, the role of hydrodynamic transport in an important episodic event - the spring 1998 massive red tide - is quantitatively examined. It is shown that the strong NE to E wind during late March to early April, coupled with the diurnal tide at the beginning of April, significantly increased the probability of bloom transport into the Port Shelter and East Lamma Channel, resulting in the massive fish kill. The results provide a basis for risk assessment of harmful algal bloom (HAB) impact on urban coastal waters around the Victoria Habour.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71737
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.435
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.422

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKuang, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, JHWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:34:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:34:43Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChina Ocean Engineering, 2005, v. 19 n. 4, p. 539-556en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0890-5487en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71737-
dc.description.abstractIn sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, algal blooms and red tides are usually first sighted in the Mirs Bay, in the eastern waters of Hong Kong. A calibrated three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the Pearl River Estuary (Delft3D) has been applied to the study of the physical hydrography of Hong Kong waters and its relationship with algal bloom transport patterns in the dry and wet seasons. The general 3D hydrodynamic circulation and salinity structure in the partially-mixed estuary are presented. Extensive numerical surface drogue tracking experiments are performed for algal blooms that are initiated in the Mirs Bay under different seasonal, wind and tidal conditions. The probability of bloom impact on the Victoria Harbour and nearby urban coastal waters is estimated. The computations show that: i) In the wet season (May-August), algal blooms initiated in the Mirs Bay will move in a clockwise direction out of the bay, and be transported away from Hong Kong due to SW monsoon winds which drive the SW to NE coastal current; ii) In the dry season (November-April), algal blooms initiated in the northeast Mirs Bay will move in an anti-clockwise direction and be carried away into southern waters due to the NE to SW coastal current driven by the NE monsoon winds; the bloom typically flows past the east edge of the Victoria Harbour and nearby waters. Finally, the role of hydrodynamic transport in an important episodic event - the spring 1998 massive red tide - is quantitatively examined. It is shown that the strong NE to E wind during late March to early April, coupled with the diurnal tide at the beginning of April, significantly increased the probability of bloom transport into the Port Shelter and East Lamma Channel, resulting in the massive fish kill. The results provide a basis for risk assessment of harmful algal bloom (HAB) impact on urban coastal waters around the Victoria Habour.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHaiyang Chubanshe.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChina Ocean Engineeringen_HK
dc.subjectDrogue trackingen_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmental hydraulicsen_HK
dc.subjectEutrophicationen_HK
dc.subjectFish killen_HK
dc.subjectHarmful algal bloomsen_HK
dc.subjectHydrodynamic modellingen_HK
dc.subjectMaricultureen_HK
dc.subjectRed tideen_HK
dc.subjectWater qualityen_HK
dc.subjectWind-induced transporten_HK
dc.titlePhysical hydrography and algal bloom transport in Hong Kong watersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0890-5487&volume=19&issue=4&spage=539&epage=556&date=2005&atitle=Physical+hydrography+and+algal+bloom+transport+in+Hong+Kong+watersen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, JHW: hreclhw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, JHW=rp00061en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644959881en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros118042en_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage539en_HK
dc.identifier.epage556en_HK
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKuang, CP=35819452600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, JHW=36078318900en_HK

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