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Article: The 1786 earthquake-triggered landslide dam and subsequent dam-break flood on the Dadu River, southwestern China

TitleThe 1786 earthquake-triggered landslide dam and subsequent dam-break flood on the Dadu River, southwestern China
Authors
KeywordsBreach
Discharge
Earthquake
Flood
Landslide dam
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/geomorph
Citation
Geomorphology, 2005, v. 65 n. 3-4, p. 205-221 How to Cite?
Abstract
Chinese historic documents recorded that on June 1, 1786, a strong M=7.75 earthquake occurred in the Kangding-Luding area, Sichuan, southwestern China, resulting in a large landslide that fell into the Dadu River. As a result, a landslide dam blocked the river. Ten days later, the sudden breaching of the dam resulted in catastrophic downstream flooding. Historic records document over 100,000 deaths by the flood. This may be the most disastrous event ever caused by landslide dam failures in the world. Although a lot of work has been carried out to determine the location, magnitude and intensity of the 1786 earthquake, relatively little is known about the occurrence and nature of the landslide dam. In this paper, the dam was reconstructed using historic documents and geomorphic evidence. It was found that the landslide dam was about 70 m high, and it created a lake with a water volume of about 50 × 106 m3 and an area of about 1.7 km2. The landslide dam breached suddenly due to a major aftershock on June 10, 1786. The peak discharge at the dam breach was estimated using regression equations and a physically based predictive equation. The possibility of a future failure of the landslide seems high, particularly due to inherent seismic risk, and detailed geotechnical investigations are strongly recommended for evaluating the current stability of the landslide. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71681
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.577
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.496
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Institute of Geology and Geophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences
  3. Chinese Academy of Sciences
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDai, FCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, CFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDeng, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTham, LGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:34:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:34:12Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGeomorphology, 2005, v. 65 n. 3-4, p. 205-221en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0169-555Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71681-
dc.description.abstractChinese historic documents recorded that on June 1, 1786, a strong M=7.75 earthquake occurred in the Kangding-Luding area, Sichuan, southwestern China, resulting in a large landslide that fell into the Dadu River. As a result, a landslide dam blocked the river. Ten days later, the sudden breaching of the dam resulted in catastrophic downstream flooding. Historic records document over 100,000 deaths by the flood. This may be the most disastrous event ever caused by landslide dam failures in the world. Although a lot of work has been carried out to determine the location, magnitude and intensity of the 1786 earthquake, relatively little is known about the occurrence and nature of the landslide dam. In this paper, the dam was reconstructed using historic documents and geomorphic evidence. It was found that the landslide dam was about 70 m high, and it created a lake with a water volume of about 50 × 106 m3 and an area of about 1.7 km2. The landslide dam breached suddenly due to a major aftershock on June 10, 1786. The peak discharge at the dam breach was estimated using regression equations and a physically based predictive equation. The possibility of a future failure of the landslide seems high, particularly due to inherent seismic risk, and detailed geotechnical investigations are strongly recommended for evaluating the current stability of the landslide. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/geomorphen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGeomorphologyen_HK
dc.rightsGeomorphology. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectBreachen_HK
dc.subjectDischargeen_HK
dc.subjectEarthquakeen_HK
dc.subjectFlooden_HK
dc.subjectLandslide damen_HK
dc.titleThe 1786 earthquake-triggered landslide dam and subsequent dam-break flood on the Dadu River, southwestern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0169-555X&volume=65&issue=3-4&spage=205&epage=221&date=2005&atitle=The+1786+earthquake-triggered+landslide+dam+and+subsequent+dam-break+flood+on+the+Dadu+River,+southwestern+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, CF: leecf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTham, LG: hrectlg@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, CF=rp00139en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTham, LG=rp00176en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.geomorph.2004.08.011en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-12944291014en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros102281en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-12944291014&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume65en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage205en_HK
dc.identifier.epage221en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227347600003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDai, FC=7102055666en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, CF=8068602600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeng, JH=7402612983en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTham, LG=7006213628en_HK

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