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Article: Critical stressors influencing construction estimators in Hong Kong

TitleCritical stressors influencing construction estimators in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsConstruction
Cost estimators
Hong Kong
Stress
Stressors
Structural equation modelling
Issue Date2005
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01446193.asp
Citation
Construction Management And Economics, 2005, v. 23 n. 1, p. 33-43 How to Cite?
AbstractThe main task of contractors' estimators is to predict the likely costs involved in executing a future project. This is an onerous job as any errors made can undermine project success and ultimately reduce the contractors' profit margins. The inherent uncertainty of most construction work, however, together with the often very short time periods involved, make errors unavoidable. Unsurprisingly, therefore, estimation is considered to be a very stressful business. To identify the nature of the stress involved, a survey of construction estimators in Hong Kong was conducted. Using correlation analysis, regression analysis and structural equation modelling, the relationships amongst the causes (stressors or stress factors) and effects (stress) were examined and a causal structural model developed. The results indicate work overload, role conflict, job ambiguity, and working environment to be the most critical stressors, with work underload and distrust being the main indirectly influencing factors. These results are similar to those of a previous study with site managers, suggesting that job ambiguity and work overload are the common problem in the construction industry. The study of the manageability of stress is expected to inspire other similar research involving other professionals in the construction industry. This is expected to be of particular significance in the long-term development of stress management in the industry in general. © 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71657
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.967
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, STen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSkitmore, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SOen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:33:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:33:59Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationConstruction Management And Economics, 2005, v. 23 n. 1, p. 33-43en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0144-6193en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71657-
dc.description.abstractThe main task of contractors' estimators is to predict the likely costs involved in executing a future project. This is an onerous job as any errors made can undermine project success and ultimately reduce the contractors' profit margins. The inherent uncertainty of most construction work, however, together with the often very short time periods involved, make errors unavoidable. Unsurprisingly, therefore, estimation is considered to be a very stressful business. To identify the nature of the stress involved, a survey of construction estimators in Hong Kong was conducted. Using correlation analysis, regression analysis and structural equation modelling, the relationships amongst the causes (stressors or stress factors) and effects (stress) were examined and a causal structural model developed. The results indicate work overload, role conflict, job ambiguity, and working environment to be the most critical stressors, with work underload and distrust being the main indirectly influencing factors. These results are similar to those of a previous study with site managers, suggesting that job ambiguity and work overload are the common problem in the construction industry. The study of the manageability of stress is expected to inspire other similar research involving other professionals in the construction industry. This is expected to be of particular significance in the long-term development of stress management in the industry in general. © 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01446193.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofConstruction Management and Economicsen_HK
dc.subjectConstructionen_HK
dc.subjectCost estimatorsen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectStressen_HK
dc.subjectStressorsen_HK
dc.subjectStructural equation modellingen_HK
dc.titleCritical stressors influencing construction estimators in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0144-6193&volume=23&issue=1&spage=33&epage=43&date=2005&atitle=Critical+stressors+influencing+construction+estimators+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, ST:tstng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, ST=rp00158en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01446190410001678099en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13944262538en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros102477en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-13944262538&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage33en_HK
dc.identifier.epage43en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, MY=8275258600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, ST=7403358853en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSkitmore, M=7003387239en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, SO=7202473419en_HK

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