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Article: Disinfection characteristics of the dissolved organic fractions at several stages of a conventional drinking water treatment plant in Southern China

TitleDisinfection characteristics of the dissolved organic fractions at several stages of a conventional drinking water treatment plant in Southern China
Authors
KeywordsChlorine consumption
Disinfection by-products
Dissolved organic matter (DOM)
Drinking water
Reverse osmosis
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jhazmat
Citation
Journal Of Hazardous Materials, 2009, v. 172 n. 2-3, p. 1093-1099 How to Cite?
AbstractDissolved organic matter (DOM) influences many aspects of drinking water treatment, including the formation of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) when disinfectants are applied. DOM was isolated and fractionated using membrane ultra-filtration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to eight individual fractions based on molecular weight cut-offs from a conventional surface water treatment plant (WTP) in Guangzhou of PR China. Molecular weights of these eight fractions were further calibrated using high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and they ranged from 0.36 to 182.6 kDa. Fractions with molecular weight <0.80 kDa obtained by YC-05 UF membrane and RO were the major ones in all four stages of the water treatment processes; both ZM-500 and YM-100 membranes showed the highest removal efficiency when coupling with conventional coagulation and sedimentation processes. The elemental analysis showed that YC-05 fraction had greater polarity and aromaticity than any of the others. Furthermore, disinfection characteristics and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) were determined for all DOM fractions obtained in this study. YC-05 fraction was the major precursor for trihalomethane (THMs) formation among the samples tested and could be removed effectively by particulate activated carbon (PAC) adsorption. RO fraction could not be removed by PAC adsorption and, as a result, consumed more chlorine in the disinfection process. The results suggested that advanced drinking water treatment should focus on the removal of low molecular weight DOM in the source water. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71586
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.836
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.692
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Guangdong Natural Science Funds021425
Funding Information:

This work was financially supported by Guangdong Natural Science Funds (021425) and additional support on Sustainable Water by the Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong. We thanks the comments of anonymous reviewers in improving this manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhao, ZYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, HBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, XYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:33:20Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:33:20Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Hazardous Materials, 2009, v. 172 n. 2-3, p. 1093-1099en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0304-3894en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71586-
dc.description.abstractDissolved organic matter (DOM) influences many aspects of drinking water treatment, including the formation of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) when disinfectants are applied. DOM was isolated and fractionated using membrane ultra-filtration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to eight individual fractions based on molecular weight cut-offs from a conventional surface water treatment plant (WTP) in Guangzhou of PR China. Molecular weights of these eight fractions were further calibrated using high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and they ranged from 0.36 to 182.6 kDa. Fractions with molecular weight <0.80 kDa obtained by YC-05 UF membrane and RO were the major ones in all four stages of the water treatment processes; both ZM-500 and YM-100 membranes showed the highest removal efficiency when coupling with conventional coagulation and sedimentation processes. The elemental analysis showed that YC-05 fraction had greater polarity and aromaticity than any of the others. Furthermore, disinfection characteristics and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) were determined for all DOM fractions obtained in this study. YC-05 fraction was the major precursor for trihalomethane (THMs) formation among the samples tested and could be removed effectively by particulate activated carbon (PAC) adsorption. RO fraction could not be removed by PAC adsorption and, as a result, consumed more chlorine in the disinfection process. The results suggested that advanced drinking water treatment should focus on the removal of low molecular weight DOM in the source water. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jhazmaten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Hazardous Materialsen_HK
dc.subjectChlorine consumptionen_HK
dc.subjectDisinfection by-productsen_HK
dc.subjectDissolved organic matter (DOM)en_HK
dc.subjectDrinking wateren_HK
dc.subjectReverse osmosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisinfection - methods - standards-
dc.subject.meshOrganic Chemicals - analysis-
dc.subject.meshTrihalomethanes-
dc.subject.meshWater Purification - standards-
dc.subject.meshWater Supply - analysis - standards-
dc.titleDisinfection characteristics of the dissolved organic fractions at several stages of a conventional drinking water treatment plant in Southern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0304-3894&volume=172&issue=2-3&spage=1093&epage=1099&date=2009&atitle=Disinfection+characteristics+of+the+dissolved+organic+fractions+at+several+stages+of+a+conventional+drinking+water+treatment+plant+in+Southern+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, XY: xlia@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, XY=rp00222en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jhazmat.2009.07.101en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19716656-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-72049089841en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros168694en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-72049089841&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume172en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2-3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1093en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1099en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271980800076-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, ZY=7404148369en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, HB=20435843100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, XY=26642887900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KMY=7401860738en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5394067-

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