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Article: Membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR): Sludge cake formation and fouling characteristics

TitleMembrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR): Sludge cake formation and fouling characteristics
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/71002188
Citation
Biotechnology And Bioengineering, 2005, v. 90 n. 3, p. 323-331 How to Cite?
AbstractA submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a working volume of 1.4 L and a hollow fiber microfiltration membrane was used to treat a contaminated raw water supply at a short hydraulic retention time (HRT) of ∼ 1 h. Filtration flux tests were conducted regularly on the membrane to determine various fouling resistances, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the biofouling development and sludge cake formation on the membrane. The experimental results demonstrate that the MBR is highly effective in drinking water treatment for the removal of organic pollutants, ammonia, and UV absorbance. During the MBR operation, the fouling materials were not uniformly distributed on the entire surface of all of the membrane fibers. The membrane was covered partially by a static sludge cake that could not be removed by the shear force of aeration, and partially by a thin sludge film that was frequently washed away by aeration turbulence. The filtration resistance coefficients were 308.4 × 1011 m -1 on average for the sludge cake, 32.5 × 1011 m-1 on average for the dynamic sludge film, and increased from 10.5 × 1011 to 59.7 × 1011 m-1 for the membrane pore fouling after 10 weeks of MBR operation at a filtration flux of 0.5 m3/m2-d. Polysaccharides and other biopolymers were found to accumulate on the membrane, and hence decreased membrane permeability. More important, the adsorption of biopolymers on the membrane modified its surface property and led to easier biomass attachment and tighter sludge cake deposition, which resulted in a progressive sludge cake growth and serious membrane fouling. The sludge cake coverage on the membrane can be minimized by the separation, with adequate space, of the membrane filters, to which sufficient aeration turbulence can then be applied. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71566
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.243
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.633
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, HPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, XYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:33:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:33:09Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiotechnology And Bioengineering, 2005, v. 90 n. 3, p. 323-331en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-3592en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71566-
dc.description.abstractA submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a working volume of 1.4 L and a hollow fiber microfiltration membrane was used to treat a contaminated raw water supply at a short hydraulic retention time (HRT) of ∼ 1 h. Filtration flux tests were conducted regularly on the membrane to determine various fouling resistances, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the biofouling development and sludge cake formation on the membrane. The experimental results demonstrate that the MBR is highly effective in drinking water treatment for the removal of organic pollutants, ammonia, and UV absorbance. During the MBR operation, the fouling materials were not uniformly distributed on the entire surface of all of the membrane fibers. The membrane was covered partially by a static sludge cake that could not be removed by the shear force of aeration, and partially by a thin sludge film that was frequently washed away by aeration turbulence. The filtration resistance coefficients were 308.4 × 1011 m -1 on average for the sludge cake, 32.5 × 1011 m-1 on average for the dynamic sludge film, and increased from 10.5 × 1011 to 59.7 × 1011 m-1 for the membrane pore fouling after 10 weeks of MBR operation at a filtration flux of 0.5 m3/m2-d. Polysaccharides and other biopolymers were found to accumulate on the membrane, and hence decreased membrane permeability. More important, the adsorption of biopolymers on the membrane modified its surface property and led to easier biomass attachment and tighter sludge cake deposition, which resulted in a progressive sludge cake growth and serious membrane fouling. The sludge cake coverage on the membrane can be minimized by the separation, with adequate space, of the membrane filters, to which sufficient aeration turbulence can then be applied. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/71002188en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiotechnology and Bioengineeringen_HK
dc.rightsBiotechnology and Bioengineering. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteria, Aerobic - cytology - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBiomassen_HK
dc.subject.meshBioreactors - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Culture Techniques - instrumentation - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Proliferationen_HK
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulationen_HK
dc.subject.meshEquipment Failure Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshMembranes, Artificialen_HK
dc.subject.meshMicrofluidics - instrumentation - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRefuse Disposal - instrumentation - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSewage - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshUltrafiltration - instrumentation - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshWater Purification - instrumentation - methodsen_HK
dc.titleMembrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR): Sludge cake formation and fouling characteristicsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0006-3592&volume=90&spage=323&epage=331&date=2005&atitle=Membrane+fouling+in+a+membrane+bioreactor+(MBR):+sludge+cake+formation+and+fouling+characteristicsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, XY:xlia@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, XY=rp00222en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/bit.20409en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15800862en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20344405470en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros105086en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20344405470&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume90en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage323en_HK
dc.identifier.epage331en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228732400006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, HP=36870373000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, XY=26642887900en_HK

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