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Article: Ecosystem appropriation by Hong Kong and its implications for sustainable development

TitleEcosystem appropriation by Hong Kong and its implications for sustainable development
Authors
KeywordsEcological footprint
Ecosystem appropriation
Guangzhou
Hong Kong, China
Pollution
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon
Citation
Ecological Economics, 2001, v. 39 n. 3, p. 347-359 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is a highly developed modern city where technical and economic advances have made it possible to support 7 million people on 120 km2 of built-up land, resulting in 58 000 people per km2, one of the highest population densities in the world. This population depends on a continual supply of materials, energy and information to function, and these resources are mainly supplied from outside Hong Kong's own geographical boundaries. The ecological footprint (EF) of Hong Kong due to its direct and indirect consumption of renewable resources and waste generation is presented. Additionally, the paper traces the spatial patterns of Hong Kong's EF and examines the implications of this ecosystem appropriation. The study finds an EF for Hong Kong of about 6 ha per capita, with the largest appropriation occurring for marine ecosystems. If the impacts of fish farming are included, Hong Kong appropriates a marine area nearly 2000 times its own built-up city area. Current resource consumption and waste generation patterns in Guangdong, China - where much of Hong Kong's terrestrial ecosystem appropriation occurs - are also discussed. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71417
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.227
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.733
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWarrenRhodes, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorKoenig, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:31:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:31:48Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEcological Economics, 2001, v. 39 n. 3, p. 347-359en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0921-8009en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71417-
dc.description.abstractThe Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is a highly developed modern city where technical and economic advances have made it possible to support 7 million people on 120 km2 of built-up land, resulting in 58 000 people per km2, one of the highest population densities in the world. This population depends on a continual supply of materials, energy and information to function, and these resources are mainly supplied from outside Hong Kong's own geographical boundaries. The ecological footprint (EF) of Hong Kong due to its direct and indirect consumption of renewable resources and waste generation is presented. Additionally, the paper traces the spatial patterns of Hong Kong's EF and examines the implications of this ecosystem appropriation. The study finds an EF for Hong Kong of about 6 ha per capita, with the largest appropriation occurring for marine ecosystems. If the impacts of fish farming are included, Hong Kong appropriates a marine area nearly 2000 times its own built-up city area. Current resource consumption and waste generation patterns in Guangdong, China - where much of Hong Kong's terrestrial ecosystem appropriation occurs - are also discussed. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecoleconen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Economicsen_HK
dc.subjectEcological footprinten_HK
dc.subjectEcosystem appropriationen_HK
dc.subjectGuangzhouen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kong, Chinaen_HK
dc.subjectPollutionen_HK
dc.titleEcosystem appropriation by Hong Kong and its implications for sustainable developmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKoenig, A:kalbert@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKoenig, A=rp00125en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0921-8009(01)00194-Xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035677848en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros66526en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035677848&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage347en_HK
dc.identifier.epage359en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000172871300003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWarrenRhodes, K=6507272414en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoenig, A=7103178143en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2277313-

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