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Article: Extracellular polymers of hydrogen-utilizing methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludges

TitleExtracellular polymers of hydrogen-utilizing methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludges
Authors
KeywordsAnaerobes
Carbohydrates
ECP
Extracellular polymers
Hydrogenotrophs
Methanogenic
Protein
Sulfate-reducing
Issue Date1996
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watres
Citation
Water Research, 1996, v. 30 n. 6, p. 1439-1444 How to Cite?
AbstractExtracellular polymers (ECP) play an important role in biological wastewater treatment. They are believed to be responsible for the formations of flocculent activated sludge as well as anaerobic granules. In this study, the ECP characteristics of two types of enrichment cultures were examined. One enriched culture was composed of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (HM) alone while the other was composed of HM and hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (HSR). Both cultures were enriched through a series of 107 repeated batches using H2/CO2 plus, in the HM/HSR series, sulfate and nutrients. At various stages of the enrichment process, the ECP were extracted from the sludge samples and analyzed for their protein (ECP,) and carbohydrate (ECP,) contents. Results showed that in the mixed culture HM consumed 67% of hydrogen and HSR 33%. The net yields of biomass for HM and HSR cultures were 0.046 g-VSS/g-COD and 0.059 g-VSS/g-COD, respectively. Productions of ECP were dependent upon substrate. Glucose-degrading sludge produced more ECP than the HM culture, which in turn produced more than the HSR culture. The net ECP yields for HM culture were 1.06 mg-ECP(p)/g-COD and 0.64 mg-ECP(c)/g-COD, respectively; the corresponding yields for HSR culture were 0.74 mg-ECP(p)/g-COD and 0.52 mg-ECP(c)/g-COD. For the enriched HM culture, more ECP(p), as well as ECP(c) but to a lesser degree, were produced at the beginning of each batch when high concentration of hydrogen was available. This was, however, not noticeable for the HSR culture. | Extracellular polymers (ECP) play an important role in biological wastewater treatment. They are believed to be responsible for the formations of flocculent activated sludge as well as anaerobic granules. In this study, the ECP characteristics of two types of enrichment cultures were examined. One enriched culture was composed of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (HM) alone while the other was composed of HM and hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (HSR). Both cultures were enriched through a series of 107 repeated batches using H2/CO2 plus, in the HM/HSR series, sulfate and nutrients. At various stages of the enrichment process, the ECP were extracted from the sludge samples and analyzed for their protein (ECPp) and carbohydrate (ECPc) contents. Results showed that in the mixed culture HM consumed 67% of hydrogen and HSR 33%. The net yields of biomass for HM and HSR cultures were 0.046 g-VSS/g-COD and 0.059 g-VSS/g-COD, respectively. Productions of ECP were dependent upon substrate. Glucose-degrading sludge produced more ECP than the HM culture, which in turn produced more than the HSR culture. The net ECP yields for HM culture were 1.06 mg-ECPp/g-COD and 0.64 mg-ECPc/g-COD, respectively; the corresponding yields for HSR culture were 0.74 mg-ECPp/g-COD and 0.52 mg-ECPc/g-COD. For the enriched HM culture, more ECPp, as well as ECPc but to a lesser degree, were produced at the beginning of each batch when high concentration of hydrogen was available. This was, however, not noticeable for the HSR culture.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71295
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.991
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.772
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJia, XSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFurumai, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFang, HHPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:30:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:30:42Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWater Research, 1996, v. 30 n. 6, p. 1439-1444en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71295-
dc.description.abstractExtracellular polymers (ECP) play an important role in biological wastewater treatment. They are believed to be responsible for the formations of flocculent activated sludge as well as anaerobic granules. In this study, the ECP characteristics of two types of enrichment cultures were examined. One enriched culture was composed of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (HM) alone while the other was composed of HM and hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (HSR). Both cultures were enriched through a series of 107 repeated batches using H2/CO2 plus, in the HM/HSR series, sulfate and nutrients. At various stages of the enrichment process, the ECP were extracted from the sludge samples and analyzed for their protein (ECP,) and carbohydrate (ECP,) contents. Results showed that in the mixed culture HM consumed 67% of hydrogen and HSR 33%. The net yields of biomass for HM and HSR cultures were 0.046 g-VSS/g-COD and 0.059 g-VSS/g-COD, respectively. Productions of ECP were dependent upon substrate. Glucose-degrading sludge produced more ECP than the HM culture, which in turn produced more than the HSR culture. The net ECP yields for HM culture were 1.06 mg-ECP(p)/g-COD and 0.64 mg-ECP(c)/g-COD, respectively; the corresponding yields for HSR culture were 0.74 mg-ECP(p)/g-COD and 0.52 mg-ECP(c)/g-COD. For the enriched HM culture, more ECP(p), as well as ECP(c) but to a lesser degree, were produced at the beginning of each batch when high concentration of hydrogen was available. This was, however, not noticeable for the HSR culture. | Extracellular polymers (ECP) play an important role in biological wastewater treatment. They are believed to be responsible for the formations of flocculent activated sludge as well as anaerobic granules. In this study, the ECP characteristics of two types of enrichment cultures were examined. One enriched culture was composed of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (HM) alone while the other was composed of HM and hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (HSR). Both cultures were enriched through a series of 107 repeated batches using H2/CO2 plus, in the HM/HSR series, sulfate and nutrients. At various stages of the enrichment process, the ECP were extracted from the sludge samples and analyzed for their protein (ECPp) and carbohydrate (ECPc) contents. Results showed that in the mixed culture HM consumed 67% of hydrogen and HSR 33%. The net yields of biomass for HM and HSR cultures were 0.046 g-VSS/g-COD and 0.059 g-VSS/g-COD, respectively. Productions of ECP were dependent upon substrate. Glucose-degrading sludge produced more ECP than the HM culture, which in turn produced more than the HSR culture. The net ECP yields for HM culture were 1.06 mg-ECPp/g-COD and 0.64 mg-ECPc/g-COD, respectively; the corresponding yields for HSR culture were 0.74 mg-ECPp/g-COD and 0.52 mg-ECPc/g-COD. For the enriched HM culture, more ECPp, as well as ECPc but to a lesser degree, were produced at the beginning of each batch when high concentration of hydrogen was available. This was, however, not noticeable for the HSR culture.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWater Researchen_HK
dc.subjectAnaerobesen_HK
dc.subjectCarbohydratesen_HK
dc.subjectECPen_HK
dc.subjectExtracellular polymersen_HK
dc.subjectHydrogenotrophsen_HK
dc.subjectMethanogenicen_HK
dc.subjectProteinen_HK
dc.subjectSulfate-reducingen_HK
dc.titleExtracellular polymers of hydrogen-utilizing methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludgesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0043-1354&volume=30&issue=6&spage=1439&epage=1444&date=1996&atitle=Extracellular+polymers+of+hydrogen-utilizing+methanogenic+and+sulfate-reducing+sludgesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFang, HHP:hrechef@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFang, HHP=rp00115en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0043-1354(96)00028-0en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030153062en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros13389en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030153062&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1439en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1444en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996UP85300016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJia, XS=7201933791en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFurumai, H=7003360137en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, HHP=7402542625en_HK

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