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Article: Hydrodynamic tracking of the massive spring 1998 red tide in Hong Kong

TitleHydrodynamic tracking of the massive spring 1998 red tide in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCoastal management
Disasters
Eutrophication
Fisheries
Hong Kong
Hydraulic models
Hydrodynamics
Tracking
Water quality
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/ee.html
Citation
Journal Of Environmental Engineering, 2004, v. 130 n. 5, p. 535-550 How to Cite?
AbstractIn subtropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, algal blooms and red tides have been frequently observed over the past two decades. In particular, in March-April 1998, a massive red tide invaded the northeastern and southern coastal waters of Hong Kong. The devastating red tide resulted in the worst fish kill in Hong Kong's history, the most significant impacts being at the Lo Tik Wan and Sok Kwu Wan fish culture zones on Lamma Island. This work reports the first scientific investigation of the cause of this massive red tide. A calibrated three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic model for the Pearl River Estuary, Delft3D, is applied to study the advective transport of red tides. Based on the tidal boundary conditions and the measured wind data for a typical spring season, the 3D flow field is computed and extensive surface drogue tracking performed for releases in different parts of the coastal waters and for different tidal and wind conditions. The results show that a bloom initiated in Mirs Bay (Nan Au or Tap Mun) in the northeastern water would likely be transported to the southern coastal waters under the combined action of tidal current and wind. The computed bloom tracking patterns are generally supported by observations and are consistent with the temporal and spatial patterns of individual fish kill events in the 1998 red tide. We conclude that the major cause of the bloom being transported into the southern waters and East Lamma Channel (and causing the massive fish kill) is the generally strong wind in March-April 1998 and the change in wind direction in early April under almost diurnal tidal conditions. Further, it is most probable that the red tide originated in Mirs Bay rather than from outside Hong Kong. The findings provide a firm basis for environmental and fisheries management. © ASCE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71218
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.125
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.462
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, JHWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQu, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:30:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:30:00Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Environmental Engineering, 2004, v. 130 n. 5, p. 535-550en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0733-9372en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71218-
dc.description.abstractIn subtropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, algal blooms and red tides have been frequently observed over the past two decades. In particular, in March-April 1998, a massive red tide invaded the northeastern and southern coastal waters of Hong Kong. The devastating red tide resulted in the worst fish kill in Hong Kong's history, the most significant impacts being at the Lo Tik Wan and Sok Kwu Wan fish culture zones on Lamma Island. This work reports the first scientific investigation of the cause of this massive red tide. A calibrated three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic model for the Pearl River Estuary, Delft3D, is applied to study the advective transport of red tides. Based on the tidal boundary conditions and the measured wind data for a typical spring season, the 3D flow field is computed and extensive surface drogue tracking performed for releases in different parts of the coastal waters and for different tidal and wind conditions. The results show that a bloom initiated in Mirs Bay (Nan Au or Tap Mun) in the northeastern water would likely be transported to the southern coastal waters under the combined action of tidal current and wind. The computed bloom tracking patterns are generally supported by observations and are consistent with the temporal and spatial patterns of individual fish kill events in the 1998 red tide. We conclude that the major cause of the bloom being transported into the southern waters and East Lamma Channel (and causing the massive fish kill) is the generally strong wind in March-April 1998 and the change in wind direction in early April under almost diurnal tidal conditions. Further, it is most probable that the red tide originated in Mirs Bay rather than from outside Hong Kong. The findings provide a firm basis for environmental and fisheries management. © ASCE.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/ee.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Environmental Engineeringen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Environmental Engineering. Copyright © American Society of Civil Engineers.en_HK
dc.subjectCoastal managementen_HK
dc.subjectDisastersen_HK
dc.subjectEutrophicationen_HK
dc.subjectFisheriesen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectHydraulic modelsen_HK
dc.subjectHydrodynamicsen_HK
dc.subjectTrackingen_HK
dc.subjectWater qualityen_HK
dc.titleHydrodynamic tracking of the massive spring 1998 red tide in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0733-9372&volume=130&issue=5&spage=535&epage=550&date=2004&atitle=Hydrodynamic+tracking+of+the+massive+spring+1998+red+tide+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, JHW: hreclhw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, JHW=rp00061en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2004)130:5(535)en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2442458837en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros90862en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2442458837&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume130en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage535en_HK
dc.identifier.epage550en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220979600008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, JHW=36078318900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQu, B=7103386039en_HK

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