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Article: Formation and characterisation of fungal and bacterial granules under different feeding alkalinity and pH conditions

TitleFormation and characterisation of fungal and bacterial granules under different feeding alkalinity and pH conditions
Authors
KeywordsAerobic granules
Biological wastewater treatment
Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)
Fungi
pH adjustment
Sequencing batch reactor (SBR)
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/procbio
Citation
Process Biochemistry, 2008, v. 43 n. 1, p. 8-14 How to Cite?
AbstractLaboratory experiments were carried out using two identical bioreactors to investigate the effect of feeding alkalinity and pH on the formation of aerobic sludge granules in wastewater treatment. Both bioreactors, of 2.4 L each in working volume and seeded with activated sludge, were operated as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) and fed at the same rate with a glucose-based synthetic wastewater. The first SBR, with a low alkalinity of 28.7 mg CaCO3/L in the influent, had a pH of about 3.0 in the reactor and achieved rapid formation of fungi-dominating granules in 1 week. The second SBR, with a high alkalinity of 301 mg CaCO3/L from the addition of 440 mg NaHCO3/L to the influent, maintained a reactor pH of around 8.1 and had a slower formation of bacteria-dominating granules, taking about 4 weeks. After granulation, both reactors performed well in organic degradation and sludge-liquid separation. However, according to examinations carried out using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), the mature fungal granules with a mean size of 7.0 mm had a loosely packed fluffy structure. Both fungi and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were distributed uniformly throughout the granules. The bacterial granules were smaller, with a mean size of 4.8 mm and a compact structure. EPS were distributed throughout and bacteria were mainly situated in the outer layer of the mature granules. Granulation of fungal sludge could be completed more rapidly than bacterial granulation. However, fungal granules were apparently weaker in structure and subject to more breakage and erosion than bacterial granules in aeration turbulence. The results suggest that by controlling the feeding alkalinity and reactor pH, a strategy of species selection can be developed for aerobic sludge granulation at different rates with different microbial communities and structural features. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/70885
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.529
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.937
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, XYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, HQen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:26:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:26:59Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProcess Biochemistry, 2008, v. 43 n. 1, p. 8-14en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1359-5113en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/70885-
dc.description.abstractLaboratory experiments were carried out using two identical bioreactors to investigate the effect of feeding alkalinity and pH on the formation of aerobic sludge granules in wastewater treatment. Both bioreactors, of 2.4 L each in working volume and seeded with activated sludge, were operated as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) and fed at the same rate with a glucose-based synthetic wastewater. The first SBR, with a low alkalinity of 28.7 mg CaCO3/L in the influent, had a pH of about 3.0 in the reactor and achieved rapid formation of fungi-dominating granules in 1 week. The second SBR, with a high alkalinity of 301 mg CaCO3/L from the addition of 440 mg NaHCO3/L to the influent, maintained a reactor pH of around 8.1 and had a slower formation of bacteria-dominating granules, taking about 4 weeks. After granulation, both reactors performed well in organic degradation and sludge-liquid separation. However, according to examinations carried out using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), the mature fungal granules with a mean size of 7.0 mm had a loosely packed fluffy structure. Both fungi and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were distributed uniformly throughout the granules. The bacterial granules were smaller, with a mean size of 4.8 mm and a compact structure. EPS were distributed throughout and bacteria were mainly situated in the outer layer of the mature granules. Granulation of fungal sludge could be completed more rapidly than bacterial granulation. However, fungal granules were apparently weaker in structure and subject to more breakage and erosion than bacterial granules in aeration turbulence. The results suggest that by controlling the feeding alkalinity and reactor pH, a strategy of species selection can be developed for aerobic sludge granulation at different rates with different microbial communities and structural features. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/procbioen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProcess Biochemistryen_HK
dc.rightsProcess Biochemistry. Copyright © Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectAerobic granulesen_HK
dc.subjectBiological wastewater treatmenten_HK
dc.subjectExtracellular polymeric substances (EPS)en_HK
dc.subjectFungien_HK
dc.subjectpH adjustmenten_HK
dc.subjectSequencing batch reactor (SBR)en_HK
dc.titleFormation and characterisation of fungal and bacterial granules under different feeding alkalinity and pH conditionsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1359-5113&volume=43&spage=8&epage=14&date=2008&atitle=Formation+and+characterisation+of+fungal+and+bacterial+granules+under+different+feeding+alkalinity+and+pH+conditionsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, XY:xlia@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, XY=rp00222en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.procbio.2007.10.008en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37149055413en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros149600en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-37149055413&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume43en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage8en_HK
dc.identifier.epage14en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253077700002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, SF=23089681900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, XY=26642887900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, HQ=13008678100en_HK

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