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Article: A case study of the management of innovation implementation within a construction project organisation

TitleA case study of the management of innovation implementation within a construction project organisation
Authors
KeywordsInnovation implementation
Top-down construction
Intra-organisation motivation
Interorganisation interaction
Case study
Issue Date2003
PublisherThe Chinese Research Institute of Construction Management. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bre.polyu.edu.hk/ijcm_Abstract/index.htm
Citation
The International Journal of Construction Management, 2003, v. 3 n. 2, p. 79-91 How to Cite?
AbstractThe purpose of this paper is to analyse and present how an innovative idea can be successfully implemented in a construction project organisation, through the case study approach. The scope of the innovation is the top-down construction technique that was implemented successfully in a building project in Singapore. The sequence of construction makes top-down construction different from conventional technique. In conventional construction, the sequence starts from the very bottom level of structure with fully completed sub-structure. In the case of the top-down technique, construction of super-structure and sub-structure can be undertaken simultaneously with the help of partially finished main support at basement and substructure level. It is concluded that the innovative technique could be successfully implemented because three main forces exist in the construction project organisation: (1) expectancy driven normative forces; (2) result driven instrumental forces; and (3) inter-organisational interactive forces. This paper is important because it shows that for innovation to be successfully implemented, the following conditions must be met: (1) clients must play an active role in the innovation; (2) client and the party who proposes the innovation must have strong bargaining positions; (3) other supporting parties to the innovation must be willing to compromise and have good working relationships with one another.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/70810
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.203

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLing, FYY-
dc.contributor.authorDulaimi, MF-
dc.contributor.authorKumaraswamy, M-
dc.contributor.authorBajracharya, A-
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:26:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:26:19Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationThe International Journal of Construction Management, 2003, v. 3 n. 2, p. 79-91-
dc.identifier.issn1562-3599-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/70810-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to analyse and present how an innovative idea can be successfully implemented in a construction project organisation, through the case study approach. The scope of the innovation is the top-down construction technique that was implemented successfully in a building project in Singapore. The sequence of construction makes top-down construction different from conventional technique. In conventional construction, the sequence starts from the very bottom level of structure with fully completed sub-structure. In the case of the top-down technique, construction of super-structure and sub-structure can be undertaken simultaneously with the help of partially finished main support at basement and substructure level. It is concluded that the innovative technique could be successfully implemented because three main forces exist in the construction project organisation: (1) expectancy driven normative forces; (2) result driven instrumental forces; and (3) inter-organisational interactive forces. This paper is important because it shows that for innovation to be successfully implemented, the following conditions must be met: (1) clients must play an active role in the innovation; (2) client and the party who proposes the innovation must have strong bargaining positions; (3) other supporting parties to the innovation must be willing to compromise and have good working relationships with one another.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe Chinese Research Institute of Construction Management. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bre.polyu.edu.hk/ijcm_Abstract/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofThe International Journal of Construction Management-
dc.subjectInnovation implementation-
dc.subjectTop-down construction-
dc.subjectIntra-organisation motivation-
dc.subjectInterorganisation interaction-
dc.subjectCase study-
dc.titleA case study of the management of innovation implementation within a construction project organisation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKumaraswamy, M: mohan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKumaraswamy, M=rp00126-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15623599.2003.10773045-
dc.identifier.hkuros94604-
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage79-
dc.identifier.epage91-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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