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Article: Small molecular gadolinium(III) complexes as MRI contrast agents for diagnostic imaging

TitleSmall molecular gadolinium(III) complexes as MRI contrast agents for diagnostic imaging
Authors
KeywordsGadolinium(III) complexes
Molecular imaging
MRI contrast agents
Polyaminocarboxylates
Protein probes
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ccr
Citation
Coordination Chemistry Reviews, 2007, v. 251 n. 17-20, p. 2428-2451 How to Cite?
AbstractMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that contain the gadolinium ion are widely used in biomedical research and diagnosis. The relaxation mechanism of these T 1-agents highlights their sensitivity towards the proximal environment. Greater knowledge of the structurally related relaxation mechanism, particularly factors that govern relaxivity, leads to scrutinized chelate designs that improve contrast enhancement. Cyclic and acyclic polyaminocarboxylate gadolinium complexes, especially those have favourable water exchange and tumbling rate for relaxation, have been reported to improve relaxivity and specificity. The criteria for a large relaxivity gain upon protein binding, such as the human serum albumin (HSA), are elucidated through the relaxometric study of the protein-chelate adduct. This adduct is an important model for the development of contrast agents, which may allow the in vivo visualization of proteins. The strength of HSA binding and the observed relaxivity are related to the pharmacokinetic profile of the contrast agents and give insight in the sensitivity of the agents after intravenous administration. By using animal models, an understanding of the physiology of contrast agents, including their biodistribution, excretion, and possible site of interaction, is acquired. The in vitro studies of contrast agents have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging various disease-related proteins, cell types, and gene delivery and expression. Imaging at the molecular level can be achieved through this integrative approach and the incorporation of nanotechnology in drug delivery. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/69700
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 12.994
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.100
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:16:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:16:03Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCoordination Chemistry Reviews, 2007, v. 251 n. 17-20, p. 2428-2451en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0010-8545en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/69700-
dc.description.abstractMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that contain the gadolinium ion are widely used in biomedical research and diagnosis. The relaxation mechanism of these T 1-agents highlights their sensitivity towards the proximal environment. Greater knowledge of the structurally related relaxation mechanism, particularly factors that govern relaxivity, leads to scrutinized chelate designs that improve contrast enhancement. Cyclic and acyclic polyaminocarboxylate gadolinium complexes, especially those have favourable water exchange and tumbling rate for relaxation, have been reported to improve relaxivity and specificity. The criteria for a large relaxivity gain upon protein binding, such as the human serum albumin (HSA), are elucidated through the relaxometric study of the protein-chelate adduct. This adduct is an important model for the development of contrast agents, which may allow the in vivo visualization of proteins. The strength of HSA binding and the observed relaxivity are related to the pharmacokinetic profile of the contrast agents and give insight in the sensitivity of the agents after intravenous administration. By using animal models, an understanding of the physiology of contrast agents, including their biodistribution, excretion, and possible site of interaction, is acquired. The in vitro studies of contrast agents have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging various disease-related proteins, cell types, and gene delivery and expression. Imaging at the molecular level can be achieved through this integrative approach and the incorporation of nanotechnology in drug delivery. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ccren_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCoordination Chemistry Reviewsen_HK
dc.rightsCoordination Chemistry Reviews . Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectGadolinium(III) complexesen_HK
dc.subjectMolecular imagingen_HK
dc.subjectMRI contrast agentsen_HK
dc.subjectPolyaminocarboxylatesen_HK
dc.subjectProtein probesen_HK
dc.titleSmall molecular gadolinium(III) complexes as MRI contrast agents for diagnostic imagingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0010-8545&volume=251&spage=2428&epage=2451&date=2007&atitle=Small+Molecular+Gadolinium(III)+Complexes+as+MRI+Contrast+Agents+for+Diagnostic+Imaging+en_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, WT: wtwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WT=rp00811en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ccr.2007.04.018en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548524200en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142022en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34548524200&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume251en_HK
dc.identifier.issue17-20en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2428en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2451en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250605400019-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KWY=35763564900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WT=7403973084en_HK

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