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Article: Metal phthalocyanine nanoribbons and nanowires
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TitleMetal phthalocyanine nanoribbons and nanowires
 
AuthorsTong, WY1
Djuršić, AB1
Xie, MH1
Ng, ACM1
Cheung, KY1
Chan, WK1
Leung, YH1
Lin, HW2
Gwo, S2
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jpcbfk
 
CitationJournal Of Physical Chemistry B, 2006, v. 110 n. 35, p. 17406-17413 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp062951q
 
AbstractNanoribbons and nanowires of different metal phthalocyanines (copper, nickel, iron, cobalt, and zinc), as well as copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F 16CuPc), have been grown by organic vapor-phase deposition. Their properties, as a function of substrate type, source-to-substrate distance, and substrate temperature, were studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and absorption measurements. The size and morphology of the nanostructures were found to be mainly determined by the substrate temperature. The crystal structure was dependent on the substrate temperature as well. At substrate temperatures below 200 °C, in addition to straight nanoribbons, twisted nanoribbons were found for all investigated materials except F 16CuPc, which formed helical nanoribbons upon exposure to an electron beam. The formation of different nanostructures (nanoribbons, twisted nanoribbons, and helical nanoribbons) is discussed. © 2006 American Chemical Society.
 
ISSN1520-6106
2013 Impact Factor: 3.377
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.575
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp062951q
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000240158600018
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTong, WY
 
dc.contributor.authorDjuršić, AB
 
dc.contributor.authorXie, MH
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, ACM
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KY
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YH
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, HW
 
dc.contributor.authorGwo, S
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:14:26Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:14:26Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractNanoribbons and nanowires of different metal phthalocyanines (copper, nickel, iron, cobalt, and zinc), as well as copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F 16CuPc), have been grown by organic vapor-phase deposition. Their properties, as a function of substrate type, source-to-substrate distance, and substrate temperature, were studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and absorption measurements. The size and morphology of the nanostructures were found to be mainly determined by the substrate temperature. The crystal structure was dependent on the substrate temperature as well. At substrate temperatures below 200 °C, in addition to straight nanoribbons, twisted nanoribbons were found for all investigated materials except F 16CuPc, which formed helical nanoribbons upon exposure to an electron beam. The formation of different nanostructures (nanoribbons, twisted nanoribbons, and helical nanoribbons) is discussed. © 2006 American Chemical Society.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Physical Chemistry B, 2006, v. 110 n. 35, p. 17406-17413 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp062951q
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp062951q
 
dc.identifier.epage17413
 
dc.identifier.hkuros121632
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240158600018
 
dc.identifier.issn1520-6106
2013 Impact Factor: 3.377
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.575
 
dc.identifier.issue35
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748870449
 
dc.identifier.spage17406
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/69521
 
dc.identifier.volume110
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jpcbfk
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physical Chemistry B
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleMetal phthalocyanine nanoribbons and nanowires
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. National Tsing Hua University