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Article: In vivo analysis and spatial profiling of phytochemicals in herbal tissue by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry
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TitleIn vivo analysis and spatial profiling of phytochemicals in herbal tissue by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry
 
AuthorsNg, KM2 1
Liang, Z3
Lu, W2
Tang, HW1
Zhao, Z4
Che, CM2
Cheng, YC3
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/ac
 
CitationAnalytical Chemistry, 2007, v. 79 n. 7, p. 2745-2755 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac062129i
 
AbstractMatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was developed for spatial profiling of phytochemicals and secondary metabolites in integrated herbal tissue without solvent extraction. Abundant alkaloid ions, including (+)-menisperine (m/z 356), magnoflorine (m/z 342), stepharanine (m/z 324), protonated sinomenine (m/z 330), protonated sinomendine (m/z 338), and a metabolite at m/z 314, could be directly desorbed from α-cyano-4- hydroxycinnamic acid- (CHCA-) coated stem tissue of Sinomenium acutum upon N2 laser (337 nm) ablation, while the ion signals desorbed from sinapinic acid- (SA-) coated and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid- (DHB-) coated stem tissue were at least 10 times weaker. Solvent composition in the matrix solution could have significant effects on the ion intensity of the metabolites. Under optimized conditions that maximize the ion intensity and form homogeneous matrix crystals on the tissue surface, spatial distributions of the metabolites localized in different tissue regions, including cortex, phloem, xylem, rim, and pith, and their relative abundances could be semiquantitatively determined. The three metabolites detected at m/z 356, 342, and 314 showed specific distributions in the herbal samples collected from different growing areas, while others were not. By applying principal component analysis (PCA), the characteristic metabolites in specific tissue regions could be easily determined, allowing unambiguous differentiation of the herbal samples from different geographic locations. © 2007 American Chemical Society.
 
ISSN0003-2700
2013 Impact Factor: 5.825
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac062129i
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000245304300015
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNg, KM
 
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, W
 
dc.contributor.authorTang, HW
 
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorChe, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, YC
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:12:51Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:12:51Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractMatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was developed for spatial profiling of phytochemicals and secondary metabolites in integrated herbal tissue without solvent extraction. Abundant alkaloid ions, including (+)-menisperine (m/z 356), magnoflorine (m/z 342), stepharanine (m/z 324), protonated sinomenine (m/z 330), protonated sinomendine (m/z 338), and a metabolite at m/z 314, could be directly desorbed from α-cyano-4- hydroxycinnamic acid- (CHCA-) coated stem tissue of Sinomenium acutum upon N2 laser (337 nm) ablation, while the ion signals desorbed from sinapinic acid- (SA-) coated and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid- (DHB-) coated stem tissue were at least 10 times weaker. Solvent composition in the matrix solution could have significant effects on the ion intensity of the metabolites. Under optimized conditions that maximize the ion intensity and form homogeneous matrix crystals on the tissue surface, spatial distributions of the metabolites localized in different tissue regions, including cortex, phloem, xylem, rim, and pith, and their relative abundances could be semiquantitatively determined. The three metabolites detected at m/z 356, 342, and 314 showed specific distributions in the herbal samples collected from different growing areas, while others were not. By applying principal component analysis (PCA), the characteristic metabolites in specific tissue regions could be easily determined, allowing unambiguous differentiation of the herbal samples from different geographic locations. © 2007 American Chemical Society.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAnalytical Chemistry, 2007, v. 79 n. 7, p. 2745-2755 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac062129i
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac062129i
 
dc.identifier.epage2755
 
dc.identifier.hkuros126122
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245304300015
 
dc.identifier.issn0003-2700
2013 Impact Factor: 5.825
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid17313187
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34247092007
 
dc.identifier.spage2745
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/69350
 
dc.identifier.volume79
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/ac
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAnalytical Chemistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleIn vivo analysis and spatial profiling of phytochemicals in herbal tissue by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Institute of Molecular Technology for Drug Discovery and Synthesis, Hong Kong
  3. Yale University
  4. Hong Kong Baptist University