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Article: Activities of hydrocolloids as inhibitors of acrylamide formation in model systems and fried potato strips

TitleActivities of hydrocolloids as inhibitors of acrylamide formation in model systems and fried potato strips
Authors
KeywordsAcrylamide (AA)
Alginic acid
Fried potato strips
Hydrocolloid
Pectin
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodchem
Citation
Food Chemistry, 2010, v. 121 n. 2, p. 424-428 How to Cite?
AbstractEffects of eight hydrocolloids on acrylamide (AA) formation were compared. At 2% (w/w), pectin, alginic acid (>50% reduction) and xanthan gum (∼20%) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced acrylamide formation in chemical models. In the fried snack model, effective inhibition of acrylamide formation (∼30%) by most of the hydrocolloids was observed only when the concentration was increased to 5%. Immersing potato strips for 1 h in a 1% alginic acid solution before frying produced inhibition of acrylamide formation similar to that in a 5% solution, and immersing for 5 h led to a significantly lower AA content (∼60% versus ∼30% reduction) compared with immersing for 1 h in a 1% or 5% immersion solution. Similar phenomena were also observed for pectin. The findings suggest alginic acid and pectin are promising inhibitors of acrylamide formation, and immersion time is an important determinant for their effects against acrylamide formation in fried potato products. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68762
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.391
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.420
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKong, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChu, IKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:07:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:07:29Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFood Chemistry, 2010, v. 121 n. 2, p. 424-428en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0308-8146en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68762-
dc.description.abstractEffects of eight hydrocolloids on acrylamide (AA) formation were compared. At 2% (w/w), pectin, alginic acid (>50% reduction) and xanthan gum (∼20%) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced acrylamide formation in chemical models. In the fried snack model, effective inhibition of acrylamide formation (∼30%) by most of the hydrocolloids was observed only when the concentration was increased to 5%. Immersing potato strips for 1 h in a 1% alginic acid solution before frying produced inhibition of acrylamide formation similar to that in a 5% solution, and immersing for 5 h led to a significantly lower AA content (∼60% versus ∼30% reduction) compared with immersing for 1 h in a 1% or 5% immersion solution. Similar phenomena were also observed for pectin. The findings suggest alginic acid and pectin are promising inhibitors of acrylamide formation, and immersion time is an important determinant for their effects against acrylamide formation in fried potato products. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodchemen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFood Chemistryen_HK
dc.subjectAcrylamide (AA)en_HK
dc.subjectAlginic aciden_HK
dc.subjectFried potato stripsen_HK
dc.subjectHydrocolloiden_HK
dc.subjectPectinen_HK
dc.titleActivities of hydrocolloids as inhibitors of acrylamide formation in model systems and fried potato stripsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0308-8146&volume=121&issue=2&spage=424&epage=428&date=2010&atitle=Activities+of+hydrocolloids+as+inhibitors+of+acrylamide+formation+in+model+systems+and+fried+potato+stripsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, C: clivelo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChu, IK: ivankchu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, F: sfchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, M: mfwang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, C=rp00751en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChu, IK=rp00683en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, F=rp00672en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00800en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.foodchem.2009.12.059en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-76749084730en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169747en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-76749084730&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume121en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage424en_HK
dc.identifier.epage428en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276038400017-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZeng, X=35760592200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KW=12141247000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDu, Y=35725386400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKong, R=35217869000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, C=15737175700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, IK=7103327484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, F=7404907980en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=7406691844en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6484347-

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