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Article: Serine proteinase inhibitor proteins: Exogenous and endogenous functions

TitleSerine proteinase inhibitor proteins: Exogenous and endogenous functions
Authors
KeywordsInsect resistance
Interference
Ovule RNA
PIN2 proteins
Seed abortion
Seed coat endothelium
Seed development
Serine proteinase inhibitor
Solanaceae
Issue Date2006
PublisherCABI Publishing.
Citation
In Vitro Cellular And Developmental Biology - Plant, 2006, v. 42 n. 2, p. 100-108 How to Cite?
AbstractProteinase inhibitor II (PIN2) proteins from the Solanaceae family have been previously used in plant transformation to acquire protection against caterpillars. Some of these PIN2 proteins have been shown to exhibit exogenous activities against trypsin and/or chymotrypsin in vitro. Despite their application in conferring insect resistance in transgenic plants, the endogenous roles of this family of proteins in various plant species have not been well defined. To investigate the exogenous and endogenous functions of PIN2 proteins, cDNAs encoding PIN2 proteins from the weed Solanum americanum (American black nightshade), designated SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b, were cloned and characterized. The localization of S. americanum SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b mRNAs and proteins in the reproductive tissues destined to undergo developmental programmed cell death subsequently led to investigations into their function during seed development. Using plant transformation of lettuce and S. americanum, it was evident that: (1) the expression of SaPIN2a in transgenic lettuce conferred resistance to cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) caterpillars; and (2) the expression of siRNAs from a PIN2-RNAi construct resulted in transgenic S. americanum that were impaired in seed development. These results suggest that S. americanum PIN2 proteins not only enhance resistance to caterpillars (when expressed exogenously) but they function in inhibiting endogenous proteases that are expressed during seed development. Specifically, the aborted seeds of PIN2-RNAi lines showed abnormal endothelium that subsequently affected endosperm and embryo development. © 2006 Society for In Vitro Biology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68655
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.152
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.420
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChye, MLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSin, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, ZFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, ECen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:06:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:06:30Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIn Vitro Cellular And Developmental Biology - Plant, 2006, v. 42 n. 2, p. 100-108en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1054-5476en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68655-
dc.description.abstractProteinase inhibitor II (PIN2) proteins from the Solanaceae family have been previously used in plant transformation to acquire protection against caterpillars. Some of these PIN2 proteins have been shown to exhibit exogenous activities against trypsin and/or chymotrypsin in vitro. Despite their application in conferring insect resistance in transgenic plants, the endogenous roles of this family of proteins in various plant species have not been well defined. To investigate the exogenous and endogenous functions of PIN2 proteins, cDNAs encoding PIN2 proteins from the weed Solanum americanum (American black nightshade), designated SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b, were cloned and characterized. The localization of S. americanum SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b mRNAs and proteins in the reproductive tissues destined to undergo developmental programmed cell death subsequently led to investigations into their function during seed development. Using plant transformation of lettuce and S. americanum, it was evident that: (1) the expression of SaPIN2a in transgenic lettuce conferred resistance to cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) caterpillars; and (2) the expression of siRNAs from a PIN2-RNAi construct resulted in transgenic S. americanum that were impaired in seed development. These results suggest that S. americanum PIN2 proteins not only enhance resistance to caterpillars (when expressed exogenously) but they function in inhibiting endogenous proteases that are expressed during seed development. Specifically, the aborted seeds of PIN2-RNAi lines showed abnormal endothelium that subsequently affected endosperm and embryo development. © 2006 Society for In Vitro Biology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCABI Publishing.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofIn Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Planten_HK
dc.subjectInsect resistanceen_HK
dc.subjectInterferenceen_HK
dc.subjectOvule RNAen_HK
dc.subjectPIN2 proteinsen_HK
dc.subjectSeed abortionen_HK
dc.subjectSeed coat endotheliumen_HK
dc.subjectSeed developmenten_HK
dc.subjectSerine proteinase inhibitoren_HK
dc.subjectSolanaceaeen_HK
dc.titleSerine proteinase inhibitor proteins: Exogenous and endogenous functionsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChye, ML: mlchye@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChye, ML=rp00687en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1079/IVP2005741en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33744466558en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros116572en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33744466558&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume42en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage100en_HK
dc.identifier.epage108en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237232600002-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChye, ML=7003905460en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSin, SF=7006553279en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, ZF=7405425506en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, EC=7101971768en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike606231-

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