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Article: Biting efficiency in relation to incisal angulation

TitleBiting efficiency in relation to incisal angulation
Authors
KeywordsEfficiency
Food fracture
Incisal orientation
Incision
Issue Date2006
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archoralbio
Citation
Archives Of Oral Biology, 2006, v. 51 n. 6, p. 491-497 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious studies suggest the orientation of the incisor teeth to the path of jaw movement pronouncedly affects their efficiency of action. To test this hypothesis, upper and lower incisal portions of a study model with ideal Asian occlusion were mounted on a mechanical tester and impressed into rectangular blocks made of 15.3% w/w starch gels or Cheddar cheese. At varying angulations of attack between the long axis of the teeth (defining the orientation of the tooth crown) and force direction, the teeth were driven into the blocks for 4-6 mm until fractures had grown in the foods. Both the angle of attack and the work divided by fractured area produced in the food, termed 'work to fracture', were measured. The food type (cheese or gel), incisal type (upper or lower pair) and angle of inclination were significant effects on the works to fracture. The minimal work was for angles slightly proclined to the vertical, although only angles of proclination >40° were significantly higher than all other angles. Retroclination or large angles of proclination made little difference to the work done, but produced markedly off-axis cracks. It is suggested that human incisors act most efficiently at small gapes and that orthodontic corrections will thus offer definite functional benefits. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68602
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.733
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.713
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSui, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAgrawal, KRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCorke, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLucas, PWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:06:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:06:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Oral Biology, 2006, v. 51 n. 6, p. 491-497en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-9969en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68602-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies suggest the orientation of the incisor teeth to the path of jaw movement pronouncedly affects their efficiency of action. To test this hypothesis, upper and lower incisal portions of a study model with ideal Asian occlusion were mounted on a mechanical tester and impressed into rectangular blocks made of 15.3% w/w starch gels or Cheddar cheese. At varying angulations of attack between the long axis of the teeth (defining the orientation of the tooth crown) and force direction, the teeth were driven into the blocks for 4-6 mm until fractures had grown in the foods. Both the angle of attack and the work divided by fractured area produced in the food, termed 'work to fracture', were measured. The food type (cheese or gel), incisal type (upper or lower pair) and angle of inclination were significant effects on the works to fracture. The minimal work was for angles slightly proclined to the vertical, although only angles of proclination >40° were significantly higher than all other angles. Retroclination or large angles of proclination made little difference to the work done, but produced markedly off-axis cracks. It is suggested that human incisors act most efficiently at small gapes and that orthodontic corrections will thus offer definite functional benefits. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archoralbioen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Oral Biologyen_HK
dc.subjectEfficiencyen_HK
dc.subjectFood fractureen_HK
dc.subjectIncisal orientationen_HK
dc.subjectIncisionen_HK
dc.titleBiting efficiency in relation to incisal angulationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0003-9969&volume=51&spage=491&epage=497&date=2006&atitle=Biting+efficiency+in+relation+to+incisal+angulationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCorke, H: harold@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCorke, H=rp00688en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.archoralbio.2005.11.002en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16376291-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747757595en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros121383en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33747757595&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume51en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage491en_HK
dc.identifier.epage497en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238160400008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSui, Z=14054891700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAgrawal, KR=7102038357en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorke, H=7007102942en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLucas, PW=7202397192en_HK

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