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Article: Amaranthus and buckwheat protein concentrate effects on an emulsion-type meat product
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TitleAmaranthus and buckwheat protein concentrate effects on an emulsion-type meat product
 
AuthorsBejosano, FP1
Corke, H1
 
Issue Date1998
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/meatsci
 
CitationMeat Science, 1998, v. 50 n. 3, p. 343-353 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractThe utilization of Amaranthus (five genotypes) and buckwheat protein concentrates in an emulsion-type meat product comprising beef lean, pork fat, salt and water was studied. 15% of the beef protein was replaced with the protein concentrates and the resulting meat emulsions were evaluated by thermorheology and thermal analysis. The cooking loss and physical properties of the meat gel were determined. The use of Amaranthus and buckwheat protein concentrates considerably affected both the emulsion and the cooked meat gel properties. The most favorable outcome was obtained with the buckwheat protein, which had similar effects to soy proteins. The Amaranthus protein concentrates generally did not give favorable results, although that derived from genotype K112 showed some positive effects. Correlation analysis showed that most of the observed variation in meat product properties could be explained by the emulsifying activity of the protein additive used. © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0309-1740
2013 Impact Factor: 2.231
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.522
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorBejosano, FP
 
dc.contributor.authorCorke, H
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:05:35Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:05:35Z
 
dc.date.issued1998
 
dc.description.abstractThe utilization of Amaranthus (five genotypes) and buckwheat protein concentrates in an emulsion-type meat product comprising beef lean, pork fat, salt and water was studied. 15% of the beef protein was replaced with the protein concentrates and the resulting meat emulsions were evaluated by thermorheology and thermal analysis. The cooking loss and physical properties of the meat gel were determined. The use of Amaranthus and buckwheat protein concentrates considerably affected both the emulsion and the cooked meat gel properties. The most favorable outcome was obtained with the buckwheat protein, which had similar effects to soy proteins. The Amaranthus protein concentrates generally did not give favorable results, although that derived from genotype K112 showed some positive effects. Correlation analysis showed that most of the observed variation in meat product properties could be explained by the emulsifying activity of the protein additive used. © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationMeat Science, 1998, v. 50 n. 3, p. 343-353 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage353
 
dc.identifier.hkuros40580
 
dc.identifier.issn0309-1740
2013 Impact Factor: 2.231
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.522
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
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dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032219436
 
dc.identifier.spage343
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68548
 
dc.identifier.volume50
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/meatsci
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofMeat Science
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsMeat Science. Copyright © Elsevier BV.
 
dc.titleAmaranthus and buckwheat protein concentrate effects on an emulsion-type meat product
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong