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Article: Effect of Ferulic Acid and Catechin on Sorghum and Maize Starch Pasting Properties

TitleEffect of Ferulic Acid and Catechin on Sorghum and Maize Starch Pasting Properties
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Association of Cereal Chemists, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aaccnet.org/cerealchemistry
Citation
Cereal Chemistry, 2004, v. 81 n. 3, p. 418-422 How to Cite?
AbstractThe effects of ferulic acid and catechin on starch pasting properties were studied as part of an investigation into the structure and functionality of phenolics in starch-based products. Commercial maize starch, starches from sorghum cultivars (SV2, Chirimaugute, and DC-75), and the phenolic compounds ferulic acid and catechin were used in the investigation. Pasting properties were measured using rapid viscosity analysis. Ferulic acid and catechin (up to 100 mg each) were added to maize or sorghum starch (3 g, 14% mb) in suspensions containing 10.32% dry solid content. Addition of catechin resulted in pink-colored pastes, whereas ferulic acid had no effect on paste color. Ferulic acid and catechin decreased hot paste viscosity (HPV), final viscosity, and setback viscosity of maize and sorghum starch pastes, but had no influence on the peak viscosity (PV) of the former. Both phenolics increased breakdown viscosity. Ferulic acid had greater influence on HPV, final viscosity, breakdown, and setback than catechin. Addition of catechin under acidic conditions (pH 3) decreased HPV, final viscosity, and setback of maize starch, but alkaline conditions (pH 11) slightly increased setback. Both acidic and alkaline conditions resulted in increased breakdown. Investigations on model-system interactions between ferulic acid or catechin and starch demonstrated that phenolic type and pH level both significantly influence starch pasting properties, with ferulic acid producing a more pronounced effect than catechin. The significance of these interactions is important, especially in food matrices where phenolics are to be added as functional food ingredients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68403
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.036
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.566
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBeta, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorCorke, Hen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:04:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:04:19Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCereal Chemistry, 2004, v. 81 n. 3, p. 418-422en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0009-0352en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68403-
dc.description.abstractThe effects of ferulic acid and catechin on starch pasting properties were studied as part of an investigation into the structure and functionality of phenolics in starch-based products. Commercial maize starch, starches from sorghum cultivars (SV2, Chirimaugute, and DC-75), and the phenolic compounds ferulic acid and catechin were used in the investigation. Pasting properties were measured using rapid viscosity analysis. Ferulic acid and catechin (up to 100 mg each) were added to maize or sorghum starch (3 g, 14% mb) in suspensions containing 10.32% dry solid content. Addition of catechin resulted in pink-colored pastes, whereas ferulic acid had no effect on paste color. Ferulic acid and catechin decreased hot paste viscosity (HPV), final viscosity, and setback viscosity of maize and sorghum starch pastes, but had no influence on the peak viscosity (PV) of the former. Both phenolics increased breakdown viscosity. Ferulic acid had greater influence on HPV, final viscosity, breakdown, and setback than catechin. Addition of catechin under acidic conditions (pH 3) decreased HPV, final viscosity, and setback of maize starch, but alkaline conditions (pH 11) slightly increased setback. Both acidic and alkaline conditions resulted in increased breakdown. Investigations on model-system interactions between ferulic acid or catechin and starch demonstrated that phenolic type and pH level both significantly influence starch pasting properties, with ferulic acid producing a more pronounced effect than catechin. The significance of these interactions is important, especially in food matrices where phenolics are to be added as functional food ingredients.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Association of Cereal Chemists, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aaccnet.org/cerealchemistryen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCereal Chemistryen_HK
dc.titleEffect of Ferulic Acid and Catechin on Sorghum and Maize Starch Pasting Propertiesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0009-0352&volume=81&spage=418&epage=422&date=2004&atitle=Effect+of+ferulic+acid+and+catechin+on+starch+pasting+propertiesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCorke, H: harold@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCorke, H=rp00688en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2342492314en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros91082en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2342492314&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume81en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage418en_HK
dc.identifier.epage422en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeta, T=6603223650en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorke, H=7007102942en_HK

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