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Article: Bilateral otolith contribution to spatial coding in the vestibular system.

TitleBilateral otolith contribution to spatial coding in the vestibular system.
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1021-7770
Citation
Journal of Biomedical Science, 2002, v. 9 n. 6 Pt 2, p. 574-586 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent work on the coding of spatial information in central otolith neurons has significantly advanced our knowledge of signal transformation from head-fixed otolith coordinates to space-centered coordinates during motion. In this review, emphasis is placed on the neural mechanisms by which signals generated at the bilateral labyrinths are recognized as gravity-dependent spatial information and in turn as substrate for otolithic reflexes. We first focus on the spatiotemporal neuronal response patterns (i.e. one- and two-dimensional neurons) to pure otolith stimulation, as assessed by single unit recording from the vestibular nucleus in labyrinth-intact animals. These spatiotemporal features are also analyzed in association with other electrophysiological properties to evaluate their role in the central construction of a spatial frame of reference in the otolith system. Data derived from animals with elimination of inputs from one labyrinth then provide evidence that during vestibular stimulation signals arising from a single utricle are operative at the level of both the ipsilateral and contralateral vestibular nuclei. Hemilabyrinthectomy also revealed neural asymmetries in spontaneous activity, response dynamics and spatial coding behavior between neuronal subpopulations on the two sides and as a result suggested a segregation of otolith signals reaching the ipsilateral and contralateral vestibular nuclei. Recent studies have confirmed and extended previous observations that the recovery of resting activity within the vestibular nuclear complex during vestibular compensation is related to changes in both intrinsic membrane properties and capacities to respond to extracellular factors. The bilateral imbalance provides the basis for deranged spatial coding and motor deficits accompanying hemilabyrinthectomy. Taken together, these experimental findings indicate that in the normal state converging inputs from bilateral vestibular labyrinths are essential to spatiotemporal signal transformation at the central otolith neurons during low-frequency head movements. Copyright 2002 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68027
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.280
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, CHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShum, DKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:00:38Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:00:38Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biomedical Science, 2002, v. 9 n. 6 Pt 2, p. 574-586en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1021-7770en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/68027-
dc.description.abstractRecent work on the coding of spatial information in central otolith neurons has significantly advanced our knowledge of signal transformation from head-fixed otolith coordinates to space-centered coordinates during motion. In this review, emphasis is placed on the neural mechanisms by which signals generated at the bilateral labyrinths are recognized as gravity-dependent spatial information and in turn as substrate for otolithic reflexes. We first focus on the spatiotemporal neuronal response patterns (i.e. one- and two-dimensional neurons) to pure otolith stimulation, as assessed by single unit recording from the vestibular nucleus in labyrinth-intact animals. These spatiotemporal features are also analyzed in association with other electrophysiological properties to evaluate their role in the central construction of a spatial frame of reference in the otolith system. Data derived from animals with elimination of inputs from one labyrinth then provide evidence that during vestibular stimulation signals arising from a single utricle are operative at the level of both the ipsilateral and contralateral vestibular nuclei. Hemilabyrinthectomy also revealed neural asymmetries in spontaneous activity, response dynamics and spatial coding behavior between neuronal subpopulations on the two sides and as a result suggested a segregation of otolith signals reaching the ipsilateral and contralateral vestibular nuclei. Recent studies have confirmed and extended previous observations that the recovery of resting activity within the vestibular nuclear complex during vestibular compensation is related to changes in both intrinsic membrane properties and capacities to respond to extracellular factors. The bilateral imbalance provides the basis for deranged spatial coding and motor deficits accompanying hemilabyrinthectomy. Taken together, these experimental findings indicate that in the normal state converging inputs from bilateral vestibular labyrinths are essential to spatiotemporal signal transformation at the central otolith neurons during low-frequency head movements. Copyright 2002 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Baselen_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1021-7770en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of biomedical scienceen_HK
dc.subject.meshMovement - Physiology-
dc.subject.meshNeurons - Physiology-
dc.subject.meshOtolithic Membrane - Physiology-
dc.subject.meshSpace Perception - Physiology-
dc.subject.meshVestibule, Labyrinth - Innervation - Physiology-
dc.titleBilateral otolith contribution to spatial coding in the vestibular system.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1021-7770&volume=9&spage=574&epage=586&date=2002&atitle=Bilateral+otolith+contribution+to+spatial+coding+in+the+vestibular+system.+++en_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, YS: yschan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, CH: chlaib@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailShum, DK: shumdkhk@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YS=rp00318en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, CH=rp00396en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityShum, DK=rp00321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF02254985-
dc.identifier.pmid12432223en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0013242775en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros81328en_HK
dc.identifier.volume9en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6 Pt 2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage574en_HK
dc.identifier.epage586en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179408700002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YS=7403676627en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, CH=7403086597en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShum, DK=7004824447en_HK

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