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Article: Delayed implantation of a peripheral nerve graft reduces motoneuron survival but does not affect regeneration following spinal root avulsion in adult rats

TitleDelayed implantation of a peripheral nerve graft reduces motoneuron survival but does not affect regeneration following spinal root avulsion in adult rats
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/neu
Citation
Journal Of Neurotrauma, 2004, v. 21 n. 8, p. 1050-1058 How to Cite?
AbstractAdult spinal motoneurons can regenerate their axons into a peripheral nerve (PN) graft following root avulsion injury if the graft is implanted immediately after the lesion is induced. The present study was designed to determine how avulsed motoneurons respond to a PN graft if implantation takes place a few days to a few weeks later. Survival, regeneration, and gene expression changes of injured motoneurons after delayed PN graft implantation were studied. The survival rates of spinal motoneurons were 78%, 65%, 57%, or 53% if a PN graft was implanted immediately, 1, 2, or 3 weeks after root avulsion, respectively. Interestingly, most of the surviving motoneurons were able to regenerate their axons into the graft regardless of the delay. All regenerating motoneurons expressed p75, but not nNOS, while all motoneurons that failed to regenerate expressed nNOS, but not p75. p75 and nNOS may, therefore, be used as markers for success or failure to regenerate axons. In the group with immediate graft implantation, 85% of the surviving motoneurons extended axons into the PN graft, while in the groups in which implantation was delayed 1, 2, or 3 weeks, 84%, 82%, and 83% of the surviving motoneurons, respectively, were found to have regenerated into the grafts. These findings indicate that avulsed spinal motoneurons retain the ability to regenerate for at least 3 weeks, and perhaps for as long as they survive. Therefore, the delayed implantation of a PN graft after root avulsion may provide a continued conducive environment to support regeneration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67842
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.377
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.945
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChai, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXie, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:58:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:58:46Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Neurotrauma, 2004, v. 21 n. 8, p. 1050-1058en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0897-7151en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67842-
dc.description.abstractAdult spinal motoneurons can regenerate their axons into a peripheral nerve (PN) graft following root avulsion injury if the graft is implanted immediately after the lesion is induced. The present study was designed to determine how avulsed motoneurons respond to a PN graft if implantation takes place a few days to a few weeks later. Survival, regeneration, and gene expression changes of injured motoneurons after delayed PN graft implantation were studied. The survival rates of spinal motoneurons were 78%, 65%, 57%, or 53% if a PN graft was implanted immediately, 1, 2, or 3 weeks after root avulsion, respectively. Interestingly, most of the surviving motoneurons were able to regenerate their axons into the graft regardless of the delay. All regenerating motoneurons expressed p75, but not nNOS, while all motoneurons that failed to regenerate expressed nNOS, but not p75. p75 and nNOS may, therefore, be used as markers for success or failure to regenerate axons. In the group with immediate graft implantation, 85% of the surviving motoneurons extended axons into the PN graft, while in the groups in which implantation was delayed 1, 2, or 3 weeks, 84%, 82%, and 83% of the surviving motoneurons, respectively, were found to have regenerated into the grafts. These findings indicate that avulsed spinal motoneurons retain the ability to regenerate for at least 3 weeks, and perhaps for as long as they survive. Therefore, the delayed implantation of a PN graft after root avulsion may provide a continued conducive environment to support regeneration.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/neuen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neurotraumaen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThis is a copy of an article published in the [Journal of Neurotrauma] © [2004] [copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.]; [Journal of Neurotrauma] is available online at: http://www.liebertonline.com.-
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Survival - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulation - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGrowth Cones - metabolism - ultrastructureen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMotor Neurons - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshNerve Regeneration - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeurosurgical Procedures - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide Synthase - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide Synthase Type Ien_HK
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Nerves - cytology - growth & development - transplantationen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA, Messenger - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshRadiculopathy - physiopathology - surgeryen_HK
dc.subject.meshRatsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_HK
dc.subject.meshReceptor, Nerve Growth Factoren_HK
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Nerve Growth Factor - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRhizotomyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpinal Nerve Roots - cytology - growth & development - injuriesen_HK
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTissue Transplantation - methodsen_HK
dc.titleDelayed implantation of a peripheral nerve graft reduces motoneuron survival but does not affect regeneration following spinal root avulsion in adult ratsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, W:wtwu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, W=rp00419en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/0897715041651006en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15319004-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4143135239en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros94997en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4143135239&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1050en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1058en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223286800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, W=7407081122en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChai, H=35918658800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, J=35492256700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, H=11339561900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXie, Y=7403958873en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, L=7404125592en_HK

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