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Article: Green tea polyphenols prevent toxin-induced hepatotoxicity in mice by down-regulating inducible nitric oxide-derived prooxidants

TitleGreen tea polyphenols prevent toxin-induced hepatotoxicity in mice by down-regulating inducible nitric oxide-derived prooxidants
Authors
KeywordsCarbon tetrachloride
Free radicals
Green tea
Lipid peroxidation
Nitric oxide
Polyphenols
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Society for Nutrition. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajcn.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2004, v. 80 n. 3, p. 742-751 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Recently, considerable attention has been focused on dietary and medicinal phytochemicals that inhibit, reverse, or retard diseases caused by oxidative and inflammatory processes. Green tea polyphenols have both antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. Objective: We examined the effects of green tea polyphenols in carbon tetrachloride-treated mice, a model of liver injury in which oxidant stress and cytokine production are intimately linked. We tested the effect of a pure form of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol in green tea, in mice treated with carbon tetrachloride. Design: Eight-week-old ICR mice were administered 20 μL/CCl 4 kg dissolved in olive oil. Two different doses of EGCG, 50 and 75 mg/kg, were tested. Control mice were treated with saline and olive oil. We analyzed liver histopathology, lipid peroxidation, and messenger RNA and protein concentrations of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Additionally, nitric oxide-generated radicals were assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and protein concentrations were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results: Carbon tetrachloride administration caused an intense degree of liver necrosis associated with increases in lipid peroxidation, inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA and protein, nitrotyrosine, and nitric oxide radicals. EGCG administration led to a dose-dependent decrease in all of the histologic and biochemical variables of liver injury observed in the carbon tetrachloride-treated mice. Conclusions: Green tea polyphenols reduce the severity of liver injury in association with lower concentrations of lipid peroxidation and proinflammatory nitric oxide-generated mediators. Green tea polyphenols can be a useful supplement in the treatment of liver disease and should be considered for liver conditions in which proinflammatory and oxidant stress responses are dominant. © 2004 American Society for Clinical Nutrition.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67757
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.703
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.771
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTipoe, GLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiong, ECen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, HSHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTom, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, PCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNanji, AAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:57:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:57:59Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2004, v. 80 n. 3, p. 742-751en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67757-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recently, considerable attention has been focused on dietary and medicinal phytochemicals that inhibit, reverse, or retard diseases caused by oxidative and inflammatory processes. Green tea polyphenols have both antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. Objective: We examined the effects of green tea polyphenols in carbon tetrachloride-treated mice, a model of liver injury in which oxidant stress and cytokine production are intimately linked. We tested the effect of a pure form of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol in green tea, in mice treated with carbon tetrachloride. Design: Eight-week-old ICR mice were administered 20 μL/CCl 4 kg dissolved in olive oil. Two different doses of EGCG, 50 and 75 mg/kg, were tested. Control mice were treated with saline and olive oil. We analyzed liver histopathology, lipid peroxidation, and messenger RNA and protein concentrations of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Additionally, nitric oxide-generated radicals were assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and protein concentrations were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results: Carbon tetrachloride administration caused an intense degree of liver necrosis associated with increases in lipid peroxidation, inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA and protein, nitrotyrosine, and nitric oxide radicals. EGCG administration led to a dose-dependent decrease in all of the histologic and biochemical variables of liver injury observed in the carbon tetrachloride-treated mice. Conclusions: Green tea polyphenols reduce the severity of liver injury in association with lower concentrations of lipid peroxidation and proinflammatory nitric oxide-generated mediators. Green tea polyphenols can be a useful supplement in the treatment of liver disease and should be considered for liver conditions in which proinflammatory and oxidant stress responses are dominant. © 2004 American Society for Clinical Nutrition.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Nutrition. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajcn.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutritionen_HK
dc.subjectCarbon tetrachlorideen_HK
dc.subjectFree radicalsen_HK
dc.subjectGreen teaen_HK
dc.subjectLipid peroxidationen_HK
dc.subjectNitric oxideen_HK
dc.subjectPolyphenolsen_HK
dc.titleGreen tea polyphenols prevent toxin-induced hepatotoxicity in mice by down-regulating inducible nitric oxide-derived prooxidantsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0002-9165&volume=80&spage=742&epage=751&date=2004&atitle=Green+tea+polyphenols+prevent+toxin-induced+hepatotoxicity+in+mice+by+down-regulating+inducible+nitric+oxide-derived+prooxidantsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTipoe, GL: tgeorge@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTom, WM: wmtoma@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTipoe, GL=rp00371en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTom, WM=rp00237en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid15321817-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4544375309en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros91969en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4544375309&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume80en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage742en_HK
dc.identifier.epage751en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223561500029-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, JH=7501879380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTipoe, GL=7003550610en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiong, EC=6602732210en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, HSH=14068993500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KM=7401860685en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTom, WM=7003709519en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, PCW=7101613315en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNanji, AA=35885060300en_HK

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