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Article: Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer: A review

TitleOncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer: A review
Authors
KeywordsOncogenes
Prostate cancer
Tumor suppressor genes
Issue Date1997
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/urolonco
Citation
Urologic Oncology, 1997, v. 3 n. 2, p. 41-46 How to Cite?
AbstractThe activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been implicated in the development of many human and animal malignancies. Changes in certain specific genes have been shown to be of potential value for diagnosis and prognosis, as well as treatment, of some cancers. By contrast, no oncogene has been correlated conclusively at the DNA level with the initiation and progression of prostate cancer, although there are alterations in expression of a number of oncogenes (i.e., ras, c-sis, c- fos, and neu) in messenger RNA and/or protein level. It is also thought that alterations of certain known TSGs, such as p53, KAI1, and E-cadherin, may be important in prostate carcinogenesis; alterations of KAI1 (known as a metastasis suppressor gene) and p53 are more likely to be associated with the late events in the development of prostate cancers. Other TSGs, such as Rb, nm23, and PAC1, require more studies to further define their role. The possible presence of TSGs in frequently altered regions on Chromosomes 6q14- 21, 8q, 10p, 10q, 13q, and 17p have been actively studied. Moreover, further studies on other frequently altered regions on chromosomes 2q, 5q, 15q, 16q, 17q, and 18q may provide further insight into the mechanism of prostate cancer progression. Future studies should be targeted on these putative oncogenes and TSGs and to determine whether assessment of specific gains or losses may have prognostic value in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67723
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.921
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.069
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, YZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, YCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:57:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:57:40Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationUrologic Oncology, 1997, v. 3 n. 2, p. 41-46en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1078-1439en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67723-
dc.description.abstractThe activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been implicated in the development of many human and animal malignancies. Changes in certain specific genes have been shown to be of potential value for diagnosis and prognosis, as well as treatment, of some cancers. By contrast, no oncogene has been correlated conclusively at the DNA level with the initiation and progression of prostate cancer, although there are alterations in expression of a number of oncogenes (i.e., ras, c-sis, c- fos, and neu) in messenger RNA and/or protein level. It is also thought that alterations of certain known TSGs, such as p53, KAI1, and E-cadherin, may be important in prostate carcinogenesis; alterations of KAI1 (known as a metastasis suppressor gene) and p53 are more likely to be associated with the late events in the development of prostate cancers. Other TSGs, such as Rb, nm23, and PAC1, require more studies to further define their role. The possible presence of TSGs in frequently altered regions on Chromosomes 6q14- 21, 8q, 10p, 10q, 13q, and 17p have been actively studied. Moreover, further studies on other frequently altered regions on chromosomes 2q, 5q, 15q, 16q, 17q, and 18q may provide further insight into the mechanism of prostate cancer progression. Future studies should be targeted on these putative oncogenes and TSGs and to determine whether assessment of specific gains or losses may have prognostic value in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/uroloncoen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofUrologic Oncologyen_HK
dc.subjectOncogenesen_HK
dc.subjectProstate canceren_HK
dc.subjectTumor suppressor genesen_HK
dc.titleOncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer: A reviewen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, YC:ycwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, YC=rp00316en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1078-1439(97)00021-5en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21227058-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030782230en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros29091en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030782230&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage41en_HK
dc.identifier.epage46en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, YZ=8581934500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YC=7403041798en_HK

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