File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Protection of sperm DNA against oxidative stress in vivo by accessory sex gland secretions in male hamsters

TitleProtection of sperm DNA against oxidative stress in vivo by accessory sex gland secretions in male hamsters
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherBioScientifica Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.reproduction-online.org
Citation
Reproduction, 2002, v. 124 n. 4, p. 491-499 How to Cite?
AbstractReactive oxygen species scavengers present in male accessory sex gland secretions might afford antioxidant protection to sperm DNA. This study was conducted to determine whether accessory sex gland secretions protect the genome and function of spermatozoa against oxidative damage in the uterus. Male golden hamsters were divided into four experimental groups: (i) all accessory sex glands removed; (ii) ampullary glands removed; (iii) ventral prostate gland removed and (iv) sham-operated controls. Ejaculated spermatozoa recovered from uteri 15-30 min after mating with experimental males and caput and cauda epididymal spermatozoa obtained from intact males were incubated in 0-20 mmol NADPH I-1 for 2 h. These spermatozoa and untreated uterine spermatozoa were processed for two types of comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis}: alkaline comet assay (pH > 13) which revealed single-strand DNA breakage and neutral comet assay (pH 9) which revealed double-strand DNA breakage. In comparison with the sham-operated controls, spermatozoa that had not been exposed to accessory sex gland secretions had a higher incidence and more extensive single-strand DNA damage with increasing concentrations of NADPH. Spermatozoa from hamsters without ampullary glands and from hamsters without the ventral prostate glands were similar to those of the control group. After incubation with NADPH, the capacity of spermatozoa from hamsters without accessory glands and from sham-operated controls to fuse with oocytes in vitro was reduced. However, only hamsters without accessory glands showed a negative correlation between single-strand DNA damage and sperm-oocyte fusion. Cauda epididymal spermatozoa were less susceptible to NADPH treatment compared with caput epididymal spermatozoa. The results of the present study showed that male accessory sex gland secretions can preserve the integrity of the sperm genome.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67700
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.184
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.472
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MPLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, PHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ALMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorO, WSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:57:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:57:28Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationReproduction, 2002, v. 124 n. 4, p. 491-499en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1470-1626en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67700-
dc.description.abstractReactive oxygen species scavengers present in male accessory sex gland secretions might afford antioxidant protection to sperm DNA. This study was conducted to determine whether accessory sex gland secretions protect the genome and function of spermatozoa against oxidative damage in the uterus. Male golden hamsters were divided into four experimental groups: (i) all accessory sex glands removed; (ii) ampullary glands removed; (iii) ventral prostate gland removed and (iv) sham-operated controls. Ejaculated spermatozoa recovered from uteri 15-30 min after mating with experimental males and caput and cauda epididymal spermatozoa obtained from intact males were incubated in 0-20 mmol NADPH I-1 for 2 h. These spermatozoa and untreated uterine spermatozoa were processed for two types of comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis}: alkaline comet assay (pH > 13) which revealed single-strand DNA breakage and neutral comet assay (pH 9) which revealed double-strand DNA breakage. In comparison with the sham-operated controls, spermatozoa that had not been exposed to accessory sex gland secretions had a higher incidence and more extensive single-strand DNA damage with increasing concentrations of NADPH. Spermatozoa from hamsters without ampullary glands and from hamsters without the ventral prostate glands were similar to those of the control group. After incubation with NADPH, the capacity of spermatozoa from hamsters without accessory glands and from sham-operated controls to fuse with oocytes in vitro was reduced. However, only hamsters without accessory glands showed a negative correlation between single-strand DNA damage and sperm-oocyte fusion. Cauda epididymal spermatozoa were less susceptible to NADPH treatment compared with caput epididymal spermatozoa. The results of the present study showed that male accessory sex gland secretions can preserve the integrity of the sperm genome.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioScientifica Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.reproduction-online.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofReproductionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBiological Factors - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCricetinaeen_HK
dc.subject.meshDNA Damageen_HK
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Drugen_HK
dc.subject.meshEpididymisen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenitalia, Male - secretionen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMesocricetusen_HK
dc.subject.meshNADP - pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshOxidative Stressen_HK
dc.subject.meshSperm-Ovum Interactions - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpermatozoa - drug effects - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshUterusen_HK
dc.titleProtection of sperm DNA against oxidative stress in vivo by accessory sex gland secretions in male hamstersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1470-1626&volume=124&spage=491&epage=499&date=2002&atitle=Protection+of+sperm+DNA+against+oxidative+stress+in+vivo+by+accessory+sex+gland+secretions+in+male+hamstersen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ALM:lmcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailO, WS:owaisum@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ALM=rp00332en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityO, WS=rp00315en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid12361467-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036794113en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros74879en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036794113&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume124en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage491en_HK
dc.identifier.epage499en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000178592600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=7501618169en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, MPL=16749051200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, PH=7202656919en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, ALM=7401806497en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, W=36077787700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO, WS=6701729369en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats