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Article: Photochemical cross-linking for collagen-based scaffolds: A study on optical properties, mechanical properties, stability, and hematocompatibility

TitlePhotochemical cross-linking for collagen-based scaffolds: A study on optical properties, mechanical properties, stability, and hematocompatibility
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/ten
Citation
Tissue Engineering, 2007, v. 13 n. 1, p. 73-85 How to Cite?
AbstractCollagen presents an attractive biomaterial for tissue engineering because of its excellent biocompatibility and negligible immunogenicity. However, some intrinsic features related to the mechanical stability and thrombogenicity limit its applications in orthopedic and vascular tissue engineering. Photochemical cross-linking is an emerging technique able to stabilize tissue grafts and improve the physicochemical properties of collagen-based structures. However, other important properties of collagen-based structures and the effect of processing parameters on these properties have not been explored. In this study, we aim to investigate the dose dependence of tensile and swelling properties on two parameters, namely, laser energy fluence and rose Bengal photosensitizer concentration. We also study the compression properties using cyclic compression test, long-term stability using subcutaneous implantation, and hematocompatibility using platelets adhesion test, of cross-linked collagen structures. Moreover, because limited optical penetration in turbid media is the major obstacle for light-based techniques, we also characterize the optical properties, which partially determine the effective optical penetration depth in collagen gel samples, during photochemical cross-linking. Laser energy fluence and rose Bengal concentration are important parameters affecting the cross-linking efficiency, which was characterized as the mechanical and the swelling properties, in a dose-dependent manner. Under the experimental conditions in this study, the peak fluence was 12.5 J/cm2 and the minimal rose Bengal concentration for effective cross-linking was >0.00008% (0.786 μmol). Photochemical cross-linking also enhanced the compression strength and long-term stability of collagen structures without compromising the tissue compatibility. Furthermore, photochemical cross-linking reduced platelet adhesion and abolished fibrin mesh formation, thereby improving the hematocompatibility of collagen structures. These results suggest the feasibility of using the photochemically cross-linked collagen structures for orthopedic and vascular tissue engineering. Finally, the effective optical penetration depth in collagen gel samples is wavelength and rose Bengal concentration dependent, and was ∼12 mm at 514 nm at 0.001% (9.825 μmol), the rose Bengal concentration mostly used in this study. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67572
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 4.254
2010 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.962
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, BPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, TYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, OCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLu, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSalomatina, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorYaroslavsky, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:56:20Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:56:20Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTissue Engineering, 2007, v. 13 n. 1, p. 73-85en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1076-3279en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67572-
dc.description.abstractCollagen presents an attractive biomaterial for tissue engineering because of its excellent biocompatibility and negligible immunogenicity. However, some intrinsic features related to the mechanical stability and thrombogenicity limit its applications in orthopedic and vascular tissue engineering. Photochemical cross-linking is an emerging technique able to stabilize tissue grafts and improve the physicochemical properties of collagen-based structures. However, other important properties of collagen-based structures and the effect of processing parameters on these properties have not been explored. In this study, we aim to investigate the dose dependence of tensile and swelling properties on two parameters, namely, laser energy fluence and rose Bengal photosensitizer concentration. We also study the compression properties using cyclic compression test, long-term stability using subcutaneous implantation, and hematocompatibility using platelets adhesion test, of cross-linked collagen structures. Moreover, because limited optical penetration in turbid media is the major obstacle for light-based techniques, we also characterize the optical properties, which partially determine the effective optical penetration depth in collagen gel samples, during photochemical cross-linking. Laser energy fluence and rose Bengal concentration are important parameters affecting the cross-linking efficiency, which was characterized as the mechanical and the swelling properties, in a dose-dependent manner. Under the experimental conditions in this study, the peak fluence was 12.5 J/cm2 and the minimal rose Bengal concentration for effective cross-linking was >0.00008% (0.786 μmol). Photochemical cross-linking also enhanced the compression strength and long-term stability of collagen structures without compromising the tissue compatibility. Furthermore, photochemical cross-linking reduced platelet adhesion and abolished fibrin mesh formation, thereby improving the hematocompatibility of collagen structures. These results suggest the feasibility of using the photochemically cross-linked collagen structures for orthopedic and vascular tissue engineering. Finally, the effective optical penetration depth in collagen gel samples is wavelength and rose Bengal concentration dependent, and was ∼12 mm at 514 nm at 0.001% (9.825 μmol), the rose Bengal concentration mostly used in this study. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/tenen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTissue Engineeringen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBiocompatible Materials - chemistry - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshCollagen Type I - chemistry - metabolism - ultrastructureen_HK
dc.subject.meshCompressive Strengthen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Linking Reagents - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshFibrin - chemistry - metabolism - ultrastructureen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhotochemistry - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Adhesivenessen_HK
dc.subject.meshRatsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRose Bengal - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshSolutionsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpectrophotometryen_HK
dc.subject.meshTensile Strengthen_HK
dc.subject.meshTissue Engineeringen_HK
dc.titlePhotochemical cross-linking for collagen-based scaffolds: A study on optical properties, mechanical properties, stability, and hematocompatibilityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1076-3279&volume=13&issue=1&spage=73&epage=85.&date=2007&atitle=Photochemical+cross-linking+for+collagen-based+scaffolds:+a+study+on+optical+properties,+mechanical+properties,+stability,+and+hematocompatibilityen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, BP:bpchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF:hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLu, W:wwlu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC:cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, BP=rp00087en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLu, W=rp00411en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/ten.2006.0004en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17518582en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846581865en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros135164en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846581865&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage73en_HK
dc.identifier.epage85en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243812300008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BP=7201530390en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, TY=36192803300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, OCM=23049435400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, KF=34668391300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, W=7404215221en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSalomatina, E=14023459100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYaroslavsky, A=6603744337en_HK

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