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Article: Male genital tract antioxidant enzymes-Their ability to preserve sperm DNA integrity

TitleMale genital tract antioxidant enzymes-Their ability to preserve sperm DNA integrity
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mce
Citation
Molecular And Cellular Endocrinology, 2006, v. 250 n. 1-2, p. 80-83 How to Cite?
AbstractMale germ cells are unique because they lose a bulk of their cytoplasm as cytoplasmic droplets when they develop, leading to a decrease in endogenous antioxidant and hence a dependence on extracellular antioxidant system to overcome oxidative stress. Spermatozoa are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress because their plasma membrane is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and membrane-bound NADPH oxidase. To protect spermatozoa from oxidative attack, an optimal amount of reactive oxygen species is maintained by balancing the reactive oxygen species generated during sperm maturation in the epididymidis and antioxidants in secretions of the male reproductive tract. The male accessory sex glands secretions have been shown to be the major source of antioxidant enzymes in the ejaculate and have the important function of preserving sperm DNA integrity from oxidative stress experienced in the uterine environment. In our in vivo golden hamster model, ablation of the five major male accessory sex glands, namely the ampullary glands, coagulating glands, dorsolateral prostate, ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, was found to cause higher incidence and greater degree of DNA damage in spermatozoa. These damaged sperm are able to undergo fertilization at the same rate as intact ones; however, the outcome of embryos sired is seriously affected. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67479
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.859
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.116
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorO, Wsen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, PHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:55:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:55:30Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMolecular And Cellular Endocrinology, 2006, v. 250 n. 1-2, p. 80-83en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0303-7207en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67479-
dc.description.abstractMale germ cells are unique because they lose a bulk of their cytoplasm as cytoplasmic droplets when they develop, leading to a decrease in endogenous antioxidant and hence a dependence on extracellular antioxidant system to overcome oxidative stress. Spermatozoa are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress because their plasma membrane is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and membrane-bound NADPH oxidase. To protect spermatozoa from oxidative attack, an optimal amount of reactive oxygen species is maintained by balancing the reactive oxygen species generated during sperm maturation in the epididymidis and antioxidants in secretions of the male reproductive tract. The male accessory sex glands secretions have been shown to be the major source of antioxidant enzymes in the ejaculate and have the important function of preserving sperm DNA integrity from oxidative stress experienced in the uterine environment. In our in vivo golden hamster model, ablation of the five major male accessory sex glands, namely the ampullary glands, coagulating glands, dorsolateral prostate, ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, was found to cause higher incidence and greater degree of DNA damage in spermatozoa. These damaged sperm are able to undergo fertilization at the same rate as intact ones; however, the outcome of embryos sired is seriously affected. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mceen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular and Cellular Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.rightsMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAntioxidants - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshCricetinaeen_HK
dc.subject.meshDNA Damageen_HK
dc.subject.meshEmbryonic Developmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFertilization - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenitalia, Male - enzymologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenomeen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpermatozoa - ultrastructureen_HK
dc.titleMale genital tract antioxidant enzymes-Their ability to preserve sperm DNA integrityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0303-7207&volume=250&spage=80&epage=83&date=2006&atitle=Male+genital+tract+antioxidant+enzymes-Their+ability+to+preserve+sperm+DNA+integrityen_HK
dc.identifier.emailO, Ws:owaisum@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityO, Ws=rp00315en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mce.2005.12.029en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16442705-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747875744en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115542en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33747875744&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume250en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage80en_HK
dc.identifier.epage83en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238020900012-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO, Ws=6701729369en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=35188523600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, PH=7202656919en_HK

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