File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Redefining tissue engineering for nanomedicine

TitleRedefining tissue engineering for nanomedicine
Authors
KeywordsNanomedicine.
Nanoscale.
Nanotechnology.
Self-assembling peptide nanofibre scaffold.
Tissue engineering.
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing.
Citation
Acta Ophthalmologica, 2010, v. 89 n. 2, p. e108-e114 How to Cite?
AbstractWorking at the nanoscale means to completely rethink how to approach engineering in the body in general and in the eye in particular. In nanomedicine, tissue engineering is the ability to influence an environment either by adding, subtracting or manipulating that environment to allow it to be more conducive for its purpose. The goal is to function at the optimum state, or to return to that optimum state. Additive tissue engineering replaces cells or tissue, or tries to get something to grow that is no longer there. Arrestive tissue engineering tries to stop aberrant growth which, if left uncontrolled, would result in a decrease in function. Nano delivery of therapeutics can perform both additive and arrestive functions influencing the environment either way, depending on the targeting. By manipulating the environment at the nanoscale, the rate and distribution of healing can be controlled. It infers that potential applications of nanomedicine in ophthalmology include procedures, such as corneal endothelial cell transplantation, single retinal ganglion cell repair, check of retinal ganglion cell viability, building of nanofibre scaffolds, such as self-assembling peptides, to create a scaffold-like tissue-bridging structure to provide a framework for axonal regeneration in the case of optic nerve reconnection or eye transplantation, and ocular drug delivery. Examples of potential arrestive therapies include gene-related treatment modalities to inhibit intraocular neovascularization and to block retinal cell apoptosis. Looking towards the future, this review focuses on how nanoscale tissue engineering can be and is being used to influence that local environment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67468
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.032
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.473
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEllis-Behnke, RGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJonas, JB-
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:55:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:55:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationActa Ophthalmologica, 2010, v. 89 n. 2, p. e108-e114en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1755-375X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67468-
dc.description.abstractWorking at the nanoscale means to completely rethink how to approach engineering in the body in general and in the eye in particular. In nanomedicine, tissue engineering is the ability to influence an environment either by adding, subtracting or manipulating that environment to allow it to be more conducive for its purpose. The goal is to function at the optimum state, or to return to that optimum state. Additive tissue engineering replaces cells or tissue, or tries to get something to grow that is no longer there. Arrestive tissue engineering tries to stop aberrant growth which, if left uncontrolled, would result in a decrease in function. Nano delivery of therapeutics can perform both additive and arrestive functions influencing the environment either way, depending on the targeting. By manipulating the environment at the nanoscale, the rate and distribution of healing can be controlled. It infers that potential applications of nanomedicine in ophthalmology include procedures, such as corneal endothelial cell transplantation, single retinal ganglion cell repair, check of retinal ganglion cell viability, building of nanofibre scaffolds, such as self-assembling peptides, to create a scaffold-like tissue-bridging structure to provide a framework for axonal regeneration in the case of optic nerve reconnection or eye transplantation, and ocular drug delivery. Examples of potential arrestive therapies include gene-related treatment modalities to inhibit intraocular neovascularization and to block retinal cell apoptosis. Looking towards the future, this review focuses on how nanoscale tissue engineering can be and is being used to influence that local environment.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing.-
dc.relation.ispartofActa Ophthalmologicaen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectNanomedicine.-
dc.subjectNanoscale.-
dc.subjectNanotechnology.-
dc.subjectSelf-assembling peptide nanofibre scaffold.-
dc.subjectTissue engineering.-
dc.titleRedefining tissue engineering for nanomedicineen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1755-3768.2010.01982.x-
dc.identifier.pmid20738260-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952275798-
dc.identifier.hkuros162458en_HK
dc.identifier.volume89-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spagee108-
dc.identifier.epagee114-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287664700001-
dc.publisher.placeOxford-
dc.customcontrol.immutableyiu 131010-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats