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Article: Photochemical crosslinking improves the physicochemical properties of collagen scaffolds

TitlePhotochemical crosslinking improves the physicochemical properties of collagen scaffolds
Authors
KeywordsCollagen
Crosslinking
Photosensitization
Physicochemical properties
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0021-9304/
Citation
Journal Of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, 2005, v. 75 n. 3, p. 689-701 How to Cite?
AbstractCollagen is a natural biomaterial with excellent biocompatibility. However, unprocessed collagen has low stability and weak mechanical strength, which limits its application in tissue engineering. The current study aimed to improve the physicochemical properties of collagen scaffolds by using photochemical crosslinking. Collagen gel was reconstituted and photochemically crosslinked by using laser irradiation in the presence of a photosensitizer. Scanning electron microscope was used to characterize the surface and cross-sectional morphology. Stress-strain relationship and other mechanical properties were determined by uniaxial tensile tests. Thermostability and water-binding capacities also were analyzed by using differential scanning calorimetry and swelling ratio measurements, respectively. Photochemically crosslinked porous structures showed fine microstructure with interconnected micron-sized pores, whereas uncrosslinked controls only showed macrosheet-like structures. The stabilizing effect of photochemical crosslinking also was revealed by retaining the three-dimensional lamellae-like structures after thermal analysis in crosslinked membranes but not in the controls. Photochemical crosslinking also significantly reduced the swelling ratio, improved the stress-strain relationship, peak load, ultimate stress, rupture strain, and tangent modulus of collagen membranes. The current study showed that an innovative photochemical crosslinking process was able to produce collagen scaffolds with fine microstructures; to strengthen, stiffen, and stabilize collagen membranes; and to modify their swelling ratio. This may broaden the use of collagen-based scaffolds in tissue engineering, particularly for weight-bearing tissues. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67422
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.263
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.979
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, BPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:55:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:55:00Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, 2005, v. 75 n. 3, p. 689-701en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1549-3296en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67422-
dc.description.abstractCollagen is a natural biomaterial with excellent biocompatibility. However, unprocessed collagen has low stability and weak mechanical strength, which limits its application in tissue engineering. The current study aimed to improve the physicochemical properties of collagen scaffolds by using photochemical crosslinking. Collagen gel was reconstituted and photochemically crosslinked by using laser irradiation in the presence of a photosensitizer. Scanning electron microscope was used to characterize the surface and cross-sectional morphology. Stress-strain relationship and other mechanical properties were determined by uniaxial tensile tests. Thermostability and water-binding capacities also were analyzed by using differential scanning calorimetry and swelling ratio measurements, respectively. Photochemically crosslinked porous structures showed fine microstructure with interconnected micron-sized pores, whereas uncrosslinked controls only showed macrosheet-like structures. The stabilizing effect of photochemical crosslinking also was revealed by retaining the three-dimensional lamellae-like structures after thermal analysis in crosslinked membranes but not in the controls. Photochemical crosslinking also significantly reduced the swelling ratio, improved the stress-strain relationship, peak load, ultimate stress, rupture strain, and tangent modulus of collagen membranes. The current study showed that an innovative photochemical crosslinking process was able to produce collagen scaffolds with fine microstructures; to strengthen, stiffen, and stabilize collagen membranes; and to modify their swelling ratio. This may broaden the use of collagen-based scaffolds in tissue engineering, particularly for weight-bearing tissues. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0021-9304/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part Aen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectCollagenen_HK
dc.subjectCrosslinkingen_HK
dc.subjectPhotosensitizationen_HK
dc.subjectPhysicochemical propertiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshCollagen - chemistry-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanning-
dc.subject.meshPhotochemistry-
dc.subject.meshSurface Properties-
dc.titlePhotochemical crosslinking improves the physicochemical properties of collagen scaffoldsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, BP:bpchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF:hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, BP=rp00087en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jbm.a.30469en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16106436en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644833756en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros119893en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644833756&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume75en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage689en_HK
dc.identifier.epage701en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233149700020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BP=7201530390en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, KF=34668391300en_HK

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