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Article: Comparison of coagulation and blood loss during anaesthesia with inhaled isoflurane or intravenous propofol

TitleComparison of coagulation and blood loss during anaesthesia with inhaled isoflurane or intravenous propofol
Authors
KeywordsAnaesthetics i.v.
Anaesthetics inhalational
Blood loss
Coagulation
Isoflurane
Propofol
Thrombelastography®
Issue Date2001
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://bja.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
British Journal Of Anaesthesia, 2001, v. 86 n. 1, p. 94-98 How to Cite?
AbstractPropofol has been reported to affect blood coagulation. This prospective, randomized study compared coagulation and blood loss during anaesthetic maintenance with target-controlled intravenous propofol infusion vs. inhaled isoflurane. Thirty-eight ASA I-III patients undergoing head and neck surgery were allocated randomly to receive either inhaled isoflurane at end-tidal concentration 1-1.5% (group I, n=20) or target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol at target concentration 2-5 μg ml -1 (group P, n=18). Thrombelastography® on recalcified whole blood w`s performed pre-induction, and at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 min post-induction and 30 min after anaesthesia in both groups. Blood loss was estimated from weighing swabs and the volume in suction bottles. Induced hypotension was not used, and perioperative body temperature was similar between groups. There were no significant differences in thrombelastographic coagulation (R-time, K-time, maximum amplitude and angle) or fibrinolytic variables (lysis index at 30 and 60 min) at all times between groups. Total blood loss was also not significantly different (median group I: 350 ml, range 20-1200 ml; group P: 200 ml, range 50-800 ml). Shortening of R-time and widening of angle developed over time in both groups (P<0.05 groups I and P, repeated measures ANOVA). We conclude that maintenance of anaesthesia with propofol TCI at 2-5 μg ml -1 does not cause detectable coagulation changes on thrombelastography® nor increase surgical blood loss when compared to inhaled isoflurane.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67321
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.616
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.314
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, NLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, KFJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMan, JSFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:53:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:53:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Anaesthesia, 2001, v. 86 n. 1, p. 94-98en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-0912en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67321-
dc.description.abstractPropofol has been reported to affect blood coagulation. This prospective, randomized study compared coagulation and blood loss during anaesthetic maintenance with target-controlled intravenous propofol infusion vs. inhaled isoflurane. Thirty-eight ASA I-III patients undergoing head and neck surgery were allocated randomly to receive either inhaled isoflurane at end-tidal concentration 1-1.5% (group I, n=20) or target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol at target concentration 2-5 μg ml -1 (group P, n=18). Thrombelastography® on recalcified whole blood w`s performed pre-induction, and at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 min post-induction and 30 min after anaesthesia in both groups. Blood loss was estimated from weighing swabs and the volume in suction bottles. Induced hypotension was not used, and perioperative body temperature was similar between groups. There were no significant differences in thrombelastographic coagulation (R-time, K-time, maximum amplitude and angle) or fibrinolytic variables (lysis index at 30 and 60 min) at all times between groups. Total blood loss was also not significantly different (median group I: 350 ml, range 20-1200 ml; group P: 200 ml, range 50-800 ml). Shortening of R-time and widening of angle developed over time in both groups (P<0.05 groups I and P, repeated measures ANOVA). We conclude that maintenance of anaesthesia with propofol TCI at 2-5 μg ml -1 does not cause detectable coagulation changes on thrombelastography® nor increase surgical blood loss when compared to inhaled isoflurane.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://bja.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Anaesthesiaen_HK
dc.subjectAnaesthetics i.v.en_HK
dc.subjectAnaesthetics inhalationalen_HK
dc.subjectBlood lossen_HK
dc.subjectCoagulationen_HK
dc.subjectIsofluraneen_HK
dc.subjectPropofolen_HK
dc.subjectThrombelastography®en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics, Inhalation - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics, Intravenous - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshBlood Coagulation - drug effects-
dc.subject.meshIsoflurane - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshPropofol - pharmacology-
dc.titleComparison of coagulation and blood loss during anaesthesia with inhaled isoflurane or intravenous propofolen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0007-0912&volume=86&spage=94&epage=98&date=2001&atitle=A+comparison+of+coagulation+and+blood+loss+during+anaesthesia+with+inhaled+isoflurane+or+intravenous+propofolen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, KFJ:jkfng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG:mgirwin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, KFJ=rp00544en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bja/86.1.94en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11575418en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035189118en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros57128en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035189118&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume86en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage94en_HK
dc.identifier.epage98en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000166153500016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK

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