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Article: Unidimensional pain rating scales: a multidimensional affect and pain survey (MAPS) analysis of what they really measure

TitleUnidimensional pain rating scales: a multidimensional affect and pain survey (MAPS) analysis of what they really measure
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pain
Citation
Pain, 2002, v. 98 n. 3, p. 241-247 How to Cite?
AbstractPain is now regarded as 'the fifth vital sign' and patients are frequently asked to score the intensity of their pain on a numerical pain rating scale (NPRS). However, the use of a unidimensional scale is questionable in view of the belief, overwhelmingly supported by clinical experience as well as by empirical evidence from multidimensional scaling and other sources, that pain has at least two dimensions: somatosensory qualities and affect. We used a Chinese translation of the 101 descriptor multidimensional affect and pain survey (MAPS) questionnaire to determine the relative contributions of various dimensions of postoperative pain to a patient's score on a unidimensional NPRS. MAPS and NPRS were administered postoperatively to 69 patients with descending colon carcinoma who were recovering from left hemi-colectomy. Multiple linear regression revealed that the emotional pain qualities supercluster (P=0.0005) and four of its eight subclusters, anxiety, depressed mood, fear and anger, significantly (P=0.001-0.007) predicted a patient's score on the unidimensional NPRS. Notably, none of the 17 subclusters in the somatosensory pain qualities supercluster predicted NPRS scores. It may be concluded that patient scores on unidimensional pain intensity scales reflect the emotional qualities of pain much more than its sensory intensity or other qualities. Accordingly such scales are poor indicators of analgesic requirement. The results also suggest that patients' postoperative anxiety and depression are inadequately treated. Based on our findings we present six unidimensional scales that should yield a more accurate assessment of the sources of a patient's pain.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67320
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.557
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.007
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorClark, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsui, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorClark, SBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:53:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:53:56Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPain, 2002, v. 98 n. 3, p. 241-247en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0304-3959en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67320-
dc.description.abstractPain is now regarded as 'the fifth vital sign' and patients are frequently asked to score the intensity of their pain on a numerical pain rating scale (NPRS). However, the use of a unidimensional scale is questionable in view of the belief, overwhelmingly supported by clinical experience as well as by empirical evidence from multidimensional scaling and other sources, that pain has at least two dimensions: somatosensory qualities and affect. We used a Chinese translation of the 101 descriptor multidimensional affect and pain survey (MAPS) questionnaire to determine the relative contributions of various dimensions of postoperative pain to a patient's score on a unidimensional NPRS. MAPS and NPRS were administered postoperatively to 69 patients with descending colon carcinoma who were recovering from left hemi-colectomy. Multiple linear regression revealed that the emotional pain qualities supercluster (P=0.0005) and four of its eight subclusters, anxiety, depressed mood, fear and anger, significantly (P=0.001-0.007) predicted a patient's score on the unidimensional NPRS. Notably, none of the 17 subclusters in the somatosensory pain qualities supercluster predicted NPRS scores. It may be concluded that patient scores on unidimensional pain intensity scales reflect the emotional qualities of pain much more than its sensory intensity or other qualities. Accordingly such scales are poor indicators of analgesic requirement. The results also suggest that patients' postoperative anxiety and depression are inadequately treated. Based on our findings we present six unidimensional scales that should yield a more accurate assessment of the sources of a patient's pain.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/painen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPainen_HK
dc.rightsPain. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysis-
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys-
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement - methods - psychology - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshPain, Postoperative - epidemiology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshLinear Models-
dc.titleUnidimensional pain rating scales: a multidimensional affect and pain survey (MAPS) analysis of what they really measureen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0304-3959&volume=98&spage=241&epage=247&date=2002&atitle=Unidimensional+pain+rating+scales:+a+multidimensional+affect+and+pain+survey+(MAPS)+analysis+of+what+they+really+measureen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYang, JCS: jcsyang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsui, SL: sltsui@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, JKF: jkfng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, JKF=rp00544en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0304-3959(01)00474-2-
dc.identifier.pmid12127025-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036063615-
dc.identifier.hkuros80459en_HK
dc.identifier.volume98-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage241-
dc.identifier.epage247-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177317700002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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