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Article: Epidural infusion of bupivacaine 0.0625% plus fentanyl 3.3 μg/ml provides better postoperative analgesia than patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine after gynaecological laparotomy

TitleEpidural infusion of bupivacaine 0.0625% plus fentanyl 3.3 μg/ml provides better postoperative analgesia than patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine after gynaecological laparotomy
Authors
KeywordsAnalgesic technique: epidural, PCA
Pain: postoperative
Issue Date1997
PublisherAustralian Society of Anaesthetists. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aaic.net.au
Citation
Anaesthesia And Intensive Care, 1997, v. 25 n. 5, p. 476-481 How to Cite?
AbstractOne hundred and twenty women undergoing gynaecological abdominal operations were randomized to receive either epidural bupivacaine 0.0625% + fentanyl 3.3 μg/ml infusion (Group EPI, n = 57), or patient-controlled intravenous morphine analgesia (Group PCA, n = 54) for postoperative pain relief. The groups were comparable in demographic data, types and duration of operation. Group EPI achieved significantly lower verbal rating scale of pain (VRS) at rest at 0, 4, 12, 16, 20, 28 and 40th postoperative hours. The VRS during cough were also significantly lower in Group EPI at 0, 4, 8, 12, 28 and 36th postoperative hours. None of the patients had respiratory depression or hypotension. Nausea/vomiting occurred in 52.6%/33.3% of patients in Group EPI and 52.7%/37.0% in Group PCA. Most patients (84.2% in Group EPI and 72.2% in Group PCA) rated their pain management as 'good'. We conclude that epidural infusion of bupivacaine 0.0625% and fentanyl 3.3 μg/ml provide better analgesia than patient-controlled intravenous morphine after gynaecological laparotomy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67316
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.283
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsui, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, DKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, KFJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, JWRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:53:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:53:54Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnaesthesia And Intensive Care, 1997, v. 25 n. 5, p. 476-481en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0310-057Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67316-
dc.description.abstractOne hundred and twenty women undergoing gynaecological abdominal operations were randomized to receive either epidural bupivacaine 0.0625% + fentanyl 3.3 μg/ml infusion (Group EPI, n = 57), or patient-controlled intravenous morphine analgesia (Group PCA, n = 54) for postoperative pain relief. The groups were comparable in demographic data, types and duration of operation. Group EPI achieved significantly lower verbal rating scale of pain (VRS) at rest at 0, 4, 12, 16, 20, 28 and 40th postoperative hours. The VRS during cough were also significantly lower in Group EPI at 0, 4, 8, 12, 28 and 36th postoperative hours. None of the patients had respiratory depression or hypotension. Nausea/vomiting occurred in 52.6%/33.3% of patients in Group EPI and 52.7%/37.0% in Group PCA. Most patients (84.2% in Group EPI and 72.2% in Group PCA) rated their pain management as 'good'. We conclude that epidural infusion of bupivacaine 0.0625% and fentanyl 3.3 μg/ml provide better analgesia than patient-controlled intravenous morphine after gynaecological laparotomy.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAustralian Society of Anaesthetists. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aaic.net.auen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnaesthesia and Intensive Careen_HK
dc.subjectAnalgesic technique: epidural, PCAen_HK
dc.subjectPain: postoperativeen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnalgesics, Opioid - administration and dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics, Local - administration and dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshBupivacaine - administration and dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshFentanyl - administration and dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshMorphine - administration and dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use-
dc.titleEpidural infusion of bupivacaine 0.0625% plus fentanyl 3.3 μg/ml provides better postoperative analgesia than patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine after gynaecological laparotomyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, KFJ:jkfng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, KFJ=rp00544en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid9352758-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031415205en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros32578en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031415205&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage476en_HK
dc.identifier.epage481en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997YC21700005-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK

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